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Sabotage Likely The Cause In Deaths Of Salmon Smolt

Sitka Sound Science Center

KTOO Public Media has details on a likely act of vandalism that killed roughly 1,100 coho salmon smolt

Hatchery intern Maria Savolainen discovered the vandalism and reported it to Sitka police.

So 1,000 juvenile salmon — no big deal, right?

Wild coho, or silver salmon, spend more than a year in freshwater after they’ve hatched, before entering the ocean.

For a hatchery, growing coho to this size — about 24 grams in weight — is a big deal.

These fish were hatched here in the spring of 2016.

“They spend that first whole winter up until April in incubation, and they come out as little more than a quarter-gram,” Bowers said.

“They look like they’re 4 or 5 inches long now?” Woolsey asked

“Yep,” Bowers said.

This is not a huge tragedy, Bowers is the first to admit that.

It’s fortunate Savoleinen came in Saturday to feed the smolt, or the tank may have drained entirely, and killed all 15,000 silvers.

A little more from the Associated Press:

“We thought it was going to be much worse than it was,” said Lisa Busch, the center’s executive director. “Why would someone do this, though?”

Staff members first believed the valve might have been turned off by accident, Busch said.

“Originally, we thought it may have been a family visiting and a kid did it,” Busch said. “But it takes some strength to turn the valve.”

The loss of the young salmon resulted in about $1,100 in damages, said Angie Bowers, the center’s aquaculture director.

The center is installing surveillance cameras and taking steps to secure the water valves against tampering, officials said.

 

The fish in the tank have been at the hatchery for nearly 20 months, Bowers said. They were scheduled to be released soon to begin an 18-month ocean journey.

 

Homer Jackpot Halibut Derby Starts Tuesday

Homer Chamber of Commerce

The following press release is courtesy of the Homer Chamber of Commerce:

The Homer Chamber of Commerce & Visitor Center’s 33rd Annual Jackpot Halibut Derby starts tomorrow, Tuesday, May 15th.

111 tags have been attached to halibut through Kachemak Bay, tags are worth $250, $500, $1000 with two tags big tags: Homer Charter Association tag worth $10,000 and the Homer Chamber of Commerce tag worth $25,000.

To enter the Derby anglers must purchase a $10 ticket prior to leaving the harbor.   But, you don’t have to fish to win; there is a “Just of the Halibut Prize” of $1,000 just for buying a ticket.

You don’t have to be good, just lucky to win big prizes during the Homer Jackpot Halibut Derby.

Historical data and other Derby info available at: www.HomerAlaska.org/jackpot-halibut-derby.html

Fishing Updates From Kodiak, Yakutat, Sitka

Fishing updates from the Alaska Department of Fish and Game:

Kodiak Fishing Report

Emergency Orders and regulation reminders

  • For full details of all Emergency Orders that have been issued this year, click on the links in the “Kodiak EO’s” box, above.
  • Effective June 1, in the Ayakulik River drainage, king salmon sport fishing is restricted to catch and release. All king salmon caught must be released without being removed from the water. In addition, bait is not allowed for any sport fishing and only single hooks on artificial lures may be used.
  • Effective June 1, in the Karluk River drainage, including Karluk Lagoon, sport fishing for king salmon is closed. In addition, the use of bait is prohibited for all sport fishing downstream of Karluk Lake.
  • Effective June 1, Monashka Creek and Bay are closed to sport fishing for king salmon. In addition, the use of bait is prohibited in Monashka Creek.
  • Remember there are new regulations for rockfish: The bag limit for rockfish in Chiniak and Marmot Bays has been reduced to 3 per day, 6 in possession, only 2 of which may be non-pelagics (4 in possession) and only 1 may be a yelloweye (2 in possession). See the 2018 Southwest Alaska regulations booklet for a detailed map of the affected area.

Fresh waters

Salmon

  • In anticipation of relatively poor returns in 2018, sport fishing for king salmon Karluk River drainage (including Karluk Lagoon) will be closed beginning June 1. In addition, the use of bait for all sport fishing is prohibited downstream of Karluk Lake and single hooks must be used.
  • Poor returns are also expected this year for the Ayakulik River king salmon run. Consequently, king salmon sport fishing is restricted to catch and release only beginning June 1. Bait is not allowed for any sport fishing during this time and only single hooks on artificial lures may be used.
  • In recent years, returns of stocked king salmon have been poor to Monashka Creek, though they have been excellent at the American and Olds rivers. Poor returns are expected again this year and Monashka Creek and Bay are subsequently closed to king salmon fishing to aid in collection of brood stock for enhancement of road system king salmon runs. In addition, in Monashka Creek, bait may not be used and only single hooks are allowed.
  • The freshwaters of Pillar Creek will be open to king salmon fishing, but the immediately adjacent saltwater’s are closed.

Trout, Dolly Varden

  • Dolly Varden are starting their migration to the ocean for the summer. Recent fishing success has been reported in Buskin Lake and in the Buskin River. Look for areas where salmon fry congregate as dollies often feed on these as they make their way back to the ocean for the summer.
  • Other popular spots on the Buskin include the Beaver Pond and near the upper weir site.

Lake Fishing

  • This is an excellent time to fish our stocked lakes as rainbows are becoming more active as waters warm up and they begin to feed more actively. Visit lower elevation lakes first as fish will be more active in warmer waters.
  • Although ADF&G currently stocks only sterile juvenile trout, some lakes with a stocking history dating to the 1950s may also contain spawning populations of adult fish. Be sure to check the local sport fishing regulations for a current list of stocked lakes as harvest of rainbow trout is only allowed in lakes that are currently stocked.
  • Rainbows typically spawn during the month of May, and anglers wishing to avoid catching these fish should target their efforts away from flowing waters into or out of the lakes during that time.

Salt waters

Halibut

  • Few reports of any catches of halibut have come in so far but look to deeper waters in the 2-300 ft range or more for halibut this time of year.

Salmon

  • Few recent reports of king salmon in the saltwaters have come in lately, though this is likely due to the weather. King salmon fishing can be excellent this time of year as kings move in closer to shore.
  • Popular spots in the spring are Kalsin Bay, Sharatin and Kizhuyak bays and in between Woody and Long islands.

Other salt water fishing

  • Black rockfish can be caught just out of the boat harbor near kelp beds along rock pinnacles and other natural or man-made structures. Rockfish are also frequently caught from shore at locations such as the outer reaches of White Sand beach and the breakwater barrier shielding St. Paul Harbor. Remember to check the current regulations for the area you intend to fish. Bag limits for rockfish have been reduced to 3 per day for pelagic rockfish in Chiniak and Marmot bays.
  • Anglers are reminded that the lingcod season does not open until July 1.

Sitka Fishing Report

Emergency Orders and Regulation Reminders

During the 2018 Board of Fisheries meeting in Sitka, regulation changes were adopted that affect sport fisheries in the Sitka area. The following is a summary of those changes:

  • A guided sport ecotourism Dungeness crab fishery was established in Nakwasina Sound, near Sitka, AK. The deadline to register for the fishery is Friday, April 13.
  • The board established a regulation requiring a shrimp permit for the noncommercial (sport, personal use, subsistence) harvest of shrimp. The department is currently developing the permit which will be available online and at Fish and Game offices. Anglers may continue to harvest shrimp under existing regulations until this permit system is developed. A news release will be forthcoming announcing when the permits will be available.
  • The board established a regulation requiring a king crab permit for the harvest of king crab in all areas of Southeast Alaska. The department is currently developing the permit which will be available online and at Fish and Game offices. Anglers may continue to harvest king crab during open seasons under existing regulations until this permit system is developed.
  • The Southeast Alaska King Salmon Management Plan was modified to allow retention of other salmon species while fishing for king salmon with two rods from October 1–March 31.
  • In the freshwater drainages of the Sitka Sound Special Use Area, the king salmon bag limit is 10 fish, 10 in possession, no size limit, and the nonresident annual limit does not apply.
  • The board established a regional sablefish annual limit of 8 fish for nonresidents, and harvest recording is required.
  • The mandatory retention requirement for nonpelagic rockfish was repealed.
  • Beginning January 1, 2020, all anglers fishing from a vessel in salt waters of Southeast Alaska will be required to have in possession, and utilize, a deep water release mechanism to return and release nonpelagic rockfish to the depth it was hooked, or to at least 100 feet in depth, whichever is shallower. All vessels will be required to have at least one functional deep water release mechanism on board and readily available for use when sport fishing activities are taking place.
  • In all waters of Central Southeast Outside Section (CSEO), the nonresident pelagic rockfish bag limit was reduced to 3 fish, with 6 allowed in possession, no size restrictions.

Current News Releases for the Sitka Management area and Southeast Alaska:

Emergency Orders are in effect for the following Sitka fisheries:

The 2018 Southeast Alaska Sport Fishing Regulations Summary is currently available, and are currently available at Fish and Game offices and at many sport fishing license vendors:
http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/static-f/regulations/fishregulations/PDFs/southeast/2018se_sfregs_complete.pdf

Relevant Spring Fisheries:

Steelhead

  • The spring steelhead fishing season is peaking in area rivers and streams. Fishing has been good for steelhead. Early abundance surveys indicate average run sizes, with fish spread throughout the drainages. Water temperatures have warmed a little as have air temperatures. Water levels remain low as snow-pack accumulated over the winter was below average.
  • Generally associated with stream systems with lakes, the Sitka area has several locations with steelhead. On the road system Sawmill Creek offers the best chance at catching a steelhead, while Indian River and Starrigavin Creek provide minimal opportunity. Other steelhead streams nearby are accessed by boat or airplane and include Salmon Creek, Sitkoh Creek, and Ford Arm Creek among others. Steelhead in the Sitka management area generally enter freshwater streams to spawn during May.

Dolly Varden and Trout

  • Dolly Varden, rainbow trout, and cutthroat trout can be targeted year-round but are most active in the spring months. Fishing is very good for these species right now.
  • Fishing with lures (spinners, spoons, plugs) or flies that imitate juvenile pink salmon emigrating from local streams should produce. There are several great locations for trout and Dolly Varden fishing in the Sitka Area. On the road system the marine waters near the mouths of Starrigavin Creek, Indian River and Sawmill Creek should be productive. Most other stream mouths accessible by boat or plane should be good as well.

Other Fisheries:

King Salmon

  • The few reports received recently indicate king fishing is decent if you are able to get out further from town. Weather recently has allowed anglers to get out to the more popular fishing locations near The Cape and Biorka producing decent catches. King salmon fishing in most Sitka area waters should begin to pick up by the end of this month.

Halibut

  • It is still early to target halibut as most fishing is done in the summer months, however catching a halibut is still possible this time of year. Good halibut catches have been reported out at The Cape. Halibut fishing in most Sitka area waters should begin to pick up by mid to late-June.

Lingcod

  • Sport fishing for lingcod is currently closed in all Southeast Alaska waters.

Rockfish

  • Fishing for rockfish is good. Rockfish are available year-round, and fishing is generally good this time of year. Anglers are encouraged to use a rockfish release device whenever releasing nonpelagic rockfish. Please see the “Southeast Alaska Sport Fish Regulation Summary” or visit your local ADF&G office to see examples of rockfish release devices and learn about their use.

For further information, please feel free to contact the Sitka area sportfish management staff at (907) 747-5355.

Yakutat Fishing Report

Steelhead Trout

Decreasing water levels and warming temps on the Situk have made for very good fishing. There a lot of fish moving around and large numbers of fall fish have dropped out of the lake to mix with incoming spring fish in the middle and upper portions of the river. With more rain in the forecast, it looks like stream flows will remain above average, but good fishing should continue for several more weeks with the warmer water temperatures.

We are begining to see steelhead pairing up, building redds, and spawning in the middle and upper portions of the river. Anglers are encouraged to give these fish space and avoid stepping on redds as they wade the river.

As a reminder, the upper Situk closure area, 2 miles upstream of 9-mile bridge and 2 miles downstream from Situk Lake, will be closed from April 15 to May 15.

King Salmon

Sport fishing for king salmon is open in Yakutat Area marine waters and while catch rates remain fairly low, kings are being caught regularly by sport anglers in inside waters along the islands and shorelines of Yakutat Bay.

The following regulations for king salmon fishing in saltwater are now in effect through May 3rd, 2019:

Residents:

  • Bag and possession limit is one king salmon, 28 inches or greater in length.
  • Residents may use two rods when fishing for king salmon from October 1, 2018 through March 31, 2019. Residents using two rods may only retain king salmon.

Nonresidents:

  • Bag and possession limit is one king salmon, 28 inches or greater in length.
  • From January 1 through June 30, 2018 the nonresident annual limit is three king salmon, 28 inches or greater in length.
  • From July 1 through December 31, 2018 the nonresident annual limit is one king salmon, 28 inches or greater in length, and any king salmon harvested January 1 through June 30 will apply to the one fish annual limit
  • Nonresidents shall immediately record, in ink, all king salmon harvested either on the back of their sport fishing license or on a nontransferable harvest record.

Sport fishing for king salmon will be closed in the freshwaters of the Situk River begining May 1st. King salmon may not be targeted, retained, or possessed; king salmon caught while fishing for other species may not be removed from the water and must be released immediately. See the News Release issued on April 23rd for more information about this closure.

Other Marine Fishing

Halibut fishing is just getting started, but we are seeing good catch rates. Lingcod season will start on May 16th.

Nonpelagic rockfish regulations for Southeast Alaska outside waters, including the Yakutat area:

  • Alaska Residents: 1 non-pelagic rockfish per day, 1 in possession, no size limit
  • Nonresidents: 1 non-pelagic rockfish per day, 1 in possession, no size limit; annual limit of 1 yelloweye which must be recorded in ink on the back of the angler’s sport fishing license or harvest record card immediately at the time of harvest

Anglers are encouraged to use a rockfish release device whenever releasing nonpelagic rockfish. Please see the “Southeast Alaska Sport Fish Regulation Summary” or visit your local ADF&G office to see examples of rockfish release devices and learn about their use.

Regulation summaries and the most recent regulatory changes are available online and at the Yakutat ADF&G office, most local tackle and outdoor stores in Alaska.

For further information, please contact the Yakutat Area Sport Fish management biologist: Matt Catterson at (907) 784-3222

Brown Bear Euthanized After Mauling Dogs

Apologies for missing this last week, but the Juneau Empire has a report on a brown bear that had to be euthanized after it mauled three dogs in the Southeast Alaska community of Hoonah:

The male bear, estimated to between 4 and 5 years old, killed and stashed the remains of at least three dogs in Hoonah since late April, police say. A fourth dog was mauled but survived.

The bear believed responsible for the killings was euthanized at about 2 a.m. April 25, the Hoonah Police Department confirmed. Police killed the bear after it returned to a yard it had previously taken two dogs from.

Remains of three dogs were found partially buried in the woods near where the bear was killed, Interim Police Chief William Mills told the Empire.

“Due to the aggressive nature of the bear — and he kept continuing, we kept getting more reports of more missing dogs — officers were told if they had seen the bear described, that for the safety and protection of the community of Hoonah, the bear needed to be put down,” Mills said.

Two of the dogs lived at a residence near the edge of the woods. Another had been brought from a home a few blocks away, Mills said. Facebook posts indicate more dogs are missing in Hoonah, but Mills said they’ve only been able to confirm three dogs were killed by the bear.

The spate of pet maulings began on the afternoon of April 18, when a bear mauled a dog on a Hoonah property. Mills responded to that report, which was confirmed by the mother of the dog’s owner, who asked not to be identified. That dog survived and is doing “fine,” after receiving medical treatment in Juneau, its owner told the Empire.

That attack occurred at the same time Hoonah’s school lets out for the day, said Mills, who responded to the police call. Bears can become dangerously accustomed to humans, but typically only roam human settlements at night. The daytime attack worried Mills that the bear may have been desperate for food, making it a danger to the public.

“He’s been going after dogs, while what happens when he doesn’t get a dog? Does he go after one of the kids?” Mills said. “My main concern is the public here.”

Copper River Chitina Dip Net Schedule Out

 

(AK EXPEDITIONS)

The following press release is courtesy of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game:

The preliminary 2018 schedule for the Copper River Chitina Subdistrict personal use dip net salmon fishery is listed in the table below. This schedule is based on projected daily sonar counts at the Miles Lake sonar and is designed to distribute the harvest throughout the run based on actual salmon abundance.

This schedule is subject to change based on actual salmon escapement once the sonar is operational. Actual fishing times will be established through emergency order each week. Travel time for salmon between the Miles Lake sonar and Chitina is approximately two to three weeks; as a result, changes to the preliminary schedule will be announced approximately one week prior to the fishing period. After August 31, the fishery will remain open, by regulation, through September 30.

2018 Copper River Chitina Subdistrict Personal Use Salmon Fishery Preseason Schedule
Dates Fishing period
hours
Thursday, June 07, 8:00 a.m. through Sunday, June 10, 11:59 p.m. 88
Monday, June 11, 12:01 a.m. through Sunday, June 17, 11:59 p.m. 168
Monday, June 18, 12:01 a.m. through Sunday, June 24, 11:59 p.m. 168
Monday, June 25, 12:01 a.m. through Sunday, July 01, 11:59 p.m. 168
Monday, July 02, 12:01 a.m. through Wednesday, July 04, 6:00 p.m. 66
Friday, July 06, 12:00 p.m. through Sunday, July 08, 11:59 p.m. 60
Tuesday, July 10, 12:01 a.m. through Sunday, July 15, 11:59 p.m. 144
Wednesday, July 18, 12:01 a.m. through Sunday, July 22, 11:59 p.m. 120
Wednesday, July 25, 6:00 p.m. through Sunday, July 29, 11:59 p.m. 102
Wednesday, August 01, 6:00 p.m. through Sunday, August 05, 11:59 p.m. 102
Monday, August 06, 6:00 p.m. through Sunday, August 12, 11:59 p.m. 150
Monday, August 13, 6:00 p.m. through Friday, August 31, 11:59 p.m. Continuous

All residents of Alaska qualify to participate in this personal use fishery. A Chitina Personal Use Salmon Fishery Permit and a resident Alaska sport fishing license are required. Both dip net permits and fishing licenses can be obtained online at https://www.adfg.alaska.gov/Store/. A $15 fee is charged for the Chitina Subdistrict personal use salmon fishery permit. Revenue from the fee supports the sanitation services at the fishery and trail maintenance from O’Brien Creek to Haley Creek. Personal use permits are required to be returned to the department by October 15 whether you fished or not, and harvest can be reported online at https://www.adfg.alaska.gov/sf/PU/.

The department urges dipnetters to respect the rights of private landowners in the area and know the regulations before fishing. For information on access across private lands contact Chitina Native Corporation at (907) 823-2223.

Information regarding the fishery can be found at the ADF&G web site: http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm?adfg=PersonalUsebyAreaInteriorChitina.main. This site provides information regarding the Upper Copper River fisheries including: fishery descriptions and summaries, maps of the subdistricts, a listing of vendors that carry the permits, and links to the sonar numbers and fishing schedule emergency orders.

The current fishing schedule will be announced on the Chitina Fishery information line at 822-5224 (Glennallen), 459-7382 (Fairbanks), and 267-2511 (Anchorage). Please contact an information phone line prior to planning your trip to Chitina to ensure that the fishery will be open when you arrive. If you have any questions regarding the Chitina Subdistrict personal use fishery, please contact the ADF&G office in Glennallen at (907) 822-3309.

Most Of Yukon River Drainage To Close For King Fishing

Yukon River NWR photo by Krisitine Sowl/USFWS

The following press release is courtesy of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game:

The Division of Sport Fish is closing the Yukon River drainage (excluding the Tanana Drainage) to sport fishing for king salmon, effective 12:01 a.m. Friday, May 11, 2018. All king salmon caught incidentally while fishing for other species may not be removed from the water and must be released immediately. This restriction will remain in effect through 11:59 p.m. Monday, December 31, 2018, unless superseded by subsequent emergency order.

King salmon stocks throughout western Alaska are continuing to experience a period of low productivity and, since at least 2010, below average run strength. The 2018 preseason outlook indicates that the Yukon River king salmon run in 2018 will be below average, with very little harvestable surplus available. In the past 10 years the interim management escapement goal for king salmon passage into Canada was only attained due to extremely conservative management, including closures or severe restrictions to subsistence opportunity, complete closure of directed commercial fishing and no sale of king salmon caught during chum salmon commercial fishing periods, and sport fishery closures.

Under the 2018 preseason management strategy, the subsistence fishery for king salmon is likely to be restricted with the first arrival of king salmon in District 1. Restrictions may be implemented chronologically in each district with the upriver migration of king salmon. No sale of incidentally-caught king salmon in the commercial fishery for chum salmon will be permitted until run strength is indicated to be at the upper end of the forecast. The use of selective fishing gear (dip nets, beach seines, and closely attended wheels) will be required during the early commercial summer chum salmon fishery openings that occur; king salmon caught incidentally during these periods must be released immediately to the water alive. The anticipated below average abundance of king salmon into the Yukon River, and restrictions placed on the subsistence fishery, warrant a closure to sport fishing for king salmon in the Yukon River drainage. If inseason stock assessment information indicates that run strength will be at the upper end of the forecast, and a majority of the king salmon escapement goals and subsistence needs in the Yukon River drainage will be met, restrictions will be relaxed.

For additional information contact Tim Viavant, Regional Management Coordinator, 907-459-7266.

Editorial: Give Bristol Bay Due Process

Photo by Wikimedia user AlaskaTrekker

Interesting column in the Anchorage Daily News by Bristol Bay resident, commercial fisher and conservationist Katherine Carscallen, who is concerned about the future regarding the Pebble Mine’s pending review by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers:

I was encouraged by Sen. Lisa Murkowski’s recent call to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to extend the “scoping” timeline for Pebble’s Environmental Impact Statement. With hope that the EIS process was indeed my opportunity to weigh in in a meaningful way, I attended the scoping meeting in Dillingham with optimism. Within minutes of the meeting starting however, that optimism was quickly dashed. The meeting, adorned with posters and promotional materials provided by the mining company, was nothing more than an hour-long advertisement for the Pebble Limited Partnership.

After viewing the newest mine plan and participating in this process, I am now convinced that merely extending the scoping deadline is not going to be enough to ensure this is a fair review. This process should instead be put on hold for several reasons: First, the method the Army Corps is utilizing for gathering public testimony is unfairly designed to limit quality input from downstream fishing communities. Simply put, the Army Corps made the choice to pick winners and losers when it came to public testimony.

Two of the biggest losers were Dillingham and Homer, two great hubs of Alaska’s fishing industry. Rather than provide an open format in which community members could hear what has been said and expand on it, creating a wider and more complete record of testimony, the Army Corps chose to have the citizens of Dillingham and Homer speak privately to a court reporter in the corner. One reason cited by the Army Corps for this move? The fear that testimony would be overwhelmed by “activists.” What the Army Corps staff fails to understand is that the opposition to this mine is not the result of activism. This region revolves around fishing. And the threat of Pebble Mine is an unacceptable assault on our lives here. If we rally or protest it is because we have been suffering this threat for over a decade and we will not accept unfair treatment. The process should not punish communities who are taking an active role in protecting our way of life.

Carscallen’s entire column is a good read. So check it out.

 

Kenai Peninsula Borough Hosting Salmon Celebration On May 10

Photo by Randy King

The following press release is courtesy of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game: 

(Soldotna) – The Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G), Division of Sport Fish Soldotna office will hold its 18th Annual Kenai Peninsula Salmon Celebration on Thursday, May 10, 2018, from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. at the Johnson Lake State Park Campground in Kasilof.

Approximately 950 elementary school students from the Kenai Peninsula Borough School District will help release hatchery-raised rainbow trout catchables into Johnson Lake. Students will also be releasing coho salmon fry into Arc Lake that same day. The coho salmon fry were reared from eggs the students collected in an October ADF&G “egg take” and placed in classroom aquariums as part of the “Salmon in the Classroom” program.

Hands-on salmon-related activity booths including juvenile and adult salmon identification, salmon life-cycle displays, a macroinvertebrate touch tank, information on catch-and-release fishing, spin and fly casting practice stations, the salmon “wheel of misfortune,” water quality testing, water and wildlife safety, waterfowl identification, stream flow demonstrations, and many more activities will also be setup for students to visit. Students will need approximately two hours to complete all the activities.

The salmon-related activity booths are part of the ADF&G Aquatic Education program, which helps increase awareness of salmon and fosters a sense of stewardship toward our valuable natural resources. This event is made possible by the volunteer assistance of Sterling Elementary students, ADF&G staff, Alaska State Parks and the Kenai River Professional Guide Association, along with many other agencies and community volunteers.

For more information or to schedule elementary-age student attendance, please contact Soldotna Assistant Area Management Biologist Jenny Gates (907) 262-9368 or by e-mail at jenny.gates@alaska.gov.

2018 Lingcod Fishing Regulations Announced

ADFG file photo

The following is courtesy of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game:

2018 Alaska lingcod regulations:

Yakutat Area

  • Season: May 16 – November 30.
  • Limits:
    • Residents – 1 daily, 2 in possession, no size limit.
    • Nonresidents – 1 daily, 1 in possession, size limit: 35 inches or greater in length and less than 50 inches in length, or 55 inches or greater in length. Annual limit of 2 fish, of which only one may be 55 inches or greater in length.
      • Nonresident anglers shall immediately record the date and location (body of water fished), in ink, of all lingcod harvested either on the back of their sport fishing license or on their nontransferable harvest record
  • Charter operators and crew members may not retain lingcod while clients are on board the vessel.

These regulations are also outlined on page 16 within the Southeast Alaska 2018 Sport Fishing Regulations Summary. The Southeast Alaska 2018 Sport Fishing Regulation Summaries are available at all local ADF&G Sport Fish Division offices, online at http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm?adfg=fishregulations.se_sportfish and at most sport fishing license vendors.

These regulations are designed to ensure that the sport harvest of lingcod stays within fishery allocations established by the Alaska Board of Fisheries.

Southeast Alaska 2018 Lingcod Sport Fishing Regulations Set For The Yakutat Area

Northern Southeast Area

  • Season: May 16 – November 30.
  • Limits:
    • Residents – 1 daily, 2 in possession, no size limit.
    • Nonresidents – 1 daily, 1 in possession, size limit: 30 inches or greater in length and less than 35 inches in length, or 55 inches or greater in length. Annual limit of 2 fish, one of which is 30 to 35 inches in length, one of which is 55 inches or greater in length.
      • Nonresident anglers shall immediately record the date and location (body of water fished), in ink, of all lingcod harvested either on the back of their sport fishing license or on their nontransferable harvest record.
  • Charter operators and crew members may not retain lingcod while clients are on board the vessel.

These regulations are designed to ensure that the sport harvest of lingcod stays within the sport fishery allocations established by the Board of Fisheries.

These regulations are also outlined on page 11 within the Southeast Alaska 2018 Sport Fishing Regulations Summary. The Southeast Alaska 2018 Sport Fishing Regulation Summaries are available at all local ADF&G Sport Fish Division offices, online at http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm?adfg=fishregulations.se_sportfish and at most sport fishing license vendors.

Southeast Alaska 2018 Lingcod Sport Fishing Regulations Set For The Northern Southeast Alaska Area

Southern Southeast Area

  • Season: May 16 – November 30.
  • Limits:
    • Residents – 1 daily, 2 in possession, no size limit.
    • Nonresidents – 1 daily, 1 in possession, size limit: 30 inches or greater in length and less than 45 inches in length, or 55 inches or greater in length. Annual limit of 2 fish, one of which is 30 to 45 inches in length, one of which is 55 inches or greater in length.
      • Nonresident anglers shall immediately record the date and location (body of water fished), in ink, of all lingcod harvested either on the back of their sport fishing license or on their nontransferable harvest record.
  • Charter operators and crew members may not retain lingcod while clients are on board the vessel.

These regulations are designed to ensure that the sport harvest of lingcod stays within the sport fishery allocations established by the Board of Fisheries.

These regulations are also outlined on page 11 within the Southeast Alaska 2018 Sport Fishing Regulations Summary. The Southeast Alaska 2018 Sport Fishing Regulation Summaries are available at all local ADF&G Sport Fish Division offices, online at http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm?adfg=fishregulations.se_sportfish and at most sport fishing license vendors.

 

Southeast Alaska 2018 Lingcod Sport Fishing Regulations Set For The Southern Southeast Alaska Area

For further information, contact the nearest ADF&G office or visit:
http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/sf/EONR/index.cfm

Sitka Site For ADFG Chinook Symposium

ADFG graphic

The following press release is courtesy of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game:

The Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) invites the public to attend a Chinook Salmon Symposium, Monday, May 21, from 5:00-8:00pm, at the Harrigan Centennial Hall in Sitka. The symposium is free.

Hosted by the Alaska Department of Fish and Game, this event features presentations on:

  • Chinook salmon research– what we know about how local stocks are performing, as well as Pacific Northwest Chinook salmon stocks coastwide.
  • A look at the last 10 years of Chinook salmon management for the commercial and sport fisheries – annual allocations, actual harvest, and performance relative to the Pacific Salmon Treaty.
  • Conservative actions – 2018 management measures in response to poor Chinook salmon production.
  • Treaty transparency – a summary of the treaty past, present, and future.
  • Public process and participation – an overview of the public regulatory process and how to get involved.
  • Public question and answer session.

We encourage those interested in Southeast Chinook salmon issues to join this evening of informative presentations by our fisheries research and management team.