Category Archives: Featured Content

Reaction To Completion Of Pebble Mine Comment Period

The following press release is courtesy of the Salmon State:

ALASKA—Comments to the Army Corps of Engineers from thousands of fisheries scientists, resource managers, biologists and former mine employees make clear that Pebble Mine’s Environmental Impact Statement is anything but the rigorous scientific assessment that Senator Lisa Murkowski and others have said the project demands.

The comment period for the mine’s EIS ended at 11:59 p.m. on Monday, July 1.

“When we started to look at the EIS in detail, we at first thought that we had failed to receive the whole thing, it was so deficient,” said SalmonState Executive Director Tim Bristol. “Unfortunately those deficiencies were not mistakes, but a calculated effort to gloss over or outright ignore major issues.”

Dr. Daniel Schindler, a professor at the University of Washington’s School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences and a lead scientist for the Alaska Salmon Program, which has been studying the salmon of Bristol Bay for more than seven decades, wrote in his comments that the EIS is “careless” and suffers from “a complete lack of rigor.”

 

“If (Pebble Mine’s environmental impact) assessment was submitted to the standard scientific peer review process, I believe it would be soundly rejected and found to be unpublishable in the scientific literature,” he wrote. He highlighted 10 fatal shortcomings in the EIS, among them the underestimation of the risk of earthquakes and mine waste dump failures and an inadequate assessment of fish habitat.

Environmental scientist and former Pebble Mine consultant Molly Welker wrote that chief among her concerns are that Pebble plans to use untested water treatment plants that do not adequately treat for the mineral selenium, which is known to kill and cause deformities in fish. The mine, she wrote “is a giant experiment being conducted in an ecologically sensitive part of Alaska.”

Environmental and permitting specialist Richard Borden, a former head of environment specializing in copper mines at Rio Tinto, one of the world’s largest mining and metals corporations, wrote that the EIS “contains insufficient detail,” “commonly understates potential impacts,” and that “in a number of significant instances, the conclusions are clearly wrong.

Finally, the American Fisheries Society, the Western Division of AFS, and the Alaska chapter of AFS submitted joint comments representing more than 7,500 fisheries scientists and resource managers. They wrote that the DEIS “fails to meet basic standards of scientific rigor in a region that clearly demands the highest level of scrutiny and thoroughness.” Specifically, they said that “impacts and risks to fish and their habitats are underestimated… many conclusions are not supported by the data or analysis provided; and… critical information is missing.”

These are just a sampling of the numerous comments provided by scientists that point out fatal shortcomings in the mine’s EIS.

“Senator Lisa Murkowski has repeatedly said that the permitting process for Pebble Mine should be ‘rigorous,’ ‘robust,’ and scientifically sound,” said SalmonState’s Tim Bristol. “Instead, the ‘process’ is a rushed hack job whose aim is to push through a project that would destroy the greatest wild salmon run left in the world. After reading what salmon scientists have to say, there is only one appropriate response — reject Pebble Mine’s plan to develop a massive open pit and industrial footprint in one of the most ecologically pristine and sensitive regions on Earth. This idea is way too risky and the ACOE’s DEIS is a product born of shoddy science and naked political calculation that endangers the people, jobs, and habitat of Bristol Bay, as well as the reputation of Alaska’s world-renowned wild salmon.”

King Fishing Set To Open On Unalakleet River Drainage (Updated)

The following is courtesy of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game:

The Division of Sport Fish is opening all waters of the Unalakleet River drainage to sport fishing for king salmon effective 12:01 a.m. Wednesday, July 3, 2019. In all waters of the Unalakleet River drainage the bag and possession limit is two fish, of which only one fish may be 20 inches or greater in length. The annual harvest limit is two fish greater than 20 inches. In addition, the use of bait is allowed. Anglers are reminded to record their harvest on the back of their sport fishing license or a harvest record card for those individuals with a permanent license (PID) or resident youth under the age of 18 or nonresident youth under the age of 16.

Daily escapement counts of king salmon at the North River tower on the Unalakleet River have increased recently, and the midpoint of the Sustainable Escapement Goal (SEG) of 1,900 fish is projected to be exceeded. According to the Subdistricts 5 and 6 of the Norton Sound District and the Unalakleet River King Salmon Management Plan, when the subsistence fishery in the Unalakleet River drainage is opened to at least two 36-hour periods per week, and the subsistence fishery in the marine waters of Subdistricts 5 and 6 is opened to at least two 48-hour per week, the sport fishery may be open.

The department does not have reliable inseason stock assessment information for the Shaktoolik, Koyuk, Ungalik, Inglutalik, and Golsovia river drainages, and therefore the closure of sport fishing for king salmon and the prohibition of bait in these rivers will remain in effect. The prohibition of bait while sport fishing should minimize catch-and-release mortality for king salmon incidentally caught while sport fishing for other species.

 

Update:

Kenai River Above Slikok Creek Reopens to Fishing for Early-Run King Salmon Less than 36 Inches in Length

(Soldotna) – Sport fishing for king salmon in the Kenai River from an Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) regulatory marker located approximately 300 yards downstream of the mouth of Slikok Creek upstream to an ADF&G regulatory marker located at the outlet of Skilak Lake will reopen to the retention of king salmon under general regulations effective 12:01 a.m. Thursday, July 4 through 11:59 p.m. Wednesday, July 31, 2019. Please review the Lower Kenai River General Regulations on page 50 of the 2019 Southcentral Alaska Sport Fishing Regulations Summary booklet.

Anglers may keep one king salmon less than 36 inches in length per day and cannot have more than one king salmon in possession. Sport fishing gear is limited to one, unbaited, single-hook, artificial fly or lure.

Anglers are reminded that from Monday, July 1 through Wednesday, July 31, 2019, retention of king salmon of all sizes is allowed from the mouth of the Kenai River upstream to the ADF&G regulatory marker approximately 300 yards downstream of Slikok Creek, but the use of bait and multiple hooks is prohibited by Emergency Order 2-KS-1-23-19 issued on Tuesday, June 18, 2019.

As of June 30, 2019, the 2019 escapement estimate for early-run Kenai River king salmon is approximately 4,186 fish, which is within the optimal escapement range of 3,900 – 6,600 large (greater than 34 inches) king salmon. Allowing a limited harvest of king salmon under 36 inches in total length in the middle Kenai River is consistent with the Board of Fisheries adopted management plan and will not prevent achievement of the escapement goal. ADF&G has now moved into assessment of the Kenai River late-run king salmon return as of July 1 and will be closely monitoring this return.

Chinook Limits Reduced On Nushagak-Mulchatna Drainage

The following is courtesy of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game:

 (Dillingham) – In favor of protecting returning king salmon and ensuring fishing opportunities in the future, the Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) is implementing the following sport fishing regulation restriction in the Nushagak-Mulchatna River drainage effective 12:01 a.m. Wednesday, July 3 through 11:59 p.m. Tuesday, December 31, 2019. The bag, possession and annual limits for king salmon, 20 inches or greater in length, in the Nushagak-Mulchatna River drainage are reduced to one per day, 20 inches or greater in length, with an annual limit of two. The bag and possession limit for king salmon less than 20 inches remains at five fish, with no annual limit.

Up to two king salmon recorded before Wednesday, July 3, 2019, on the harvest portion of an Alaska sport fishing license or harvest record card do not count against the two king salmon, 20 inches or greater in length, that may be harvested on or after July 3.

Through June 30, 2019, an estimated 35,271 king salmon have passed the Portage Creek sonar. The sustainable escapement goal (SEG) for Nushagak River king salmon is 55,000 – 120,000 fish. Although, the current projection of spawning escapement is within the SEG, those projections are decreasing and are approaching the lower end of the escapement goal. Therefore, a conservative approach is warranted to reduce the Nushagak River drainage sport harvest.

“This year’s run has begun to fall behind on the projection curve,” stated assistant Area Management Biologist Lee Borden. “With the possibility of the escapement goal not being met, we are taking a conservative approach with this restriction to slow down inriver sport fishing harvests.”

ADF&G will continue to monitor the king salmon escapement and may relax this restriction or further restrict the sport fishery as specified in the management plan.

Pullen Creek and Pond Open to King Salmon Fishing

The Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) announced today that Pullen Creek and Pullen Pond, in Skagway, are open to sport fishing for king salmon effective 12:01 a.m. Saturday, July 6, 2019. In all fresh waters of Pullen Creek, including Pullen Pond, bait may be used, the bag and possession limit for all anglers (Alaska residents and nonresidents) is four king salmon of any size, and king salmon harvested in this area do not count toward the nonresident annual limit. This regulation will remain in effect through 11:59 p.m. Saturday, September 14, 2019. This additional opportunity is being provided to allow harvest of hatchery-produced king salmon that have returned to Pullen Creek.

Anglers are reminded that all salt waters in the Skagway and Haines area remain closed to king salmon retention through the end of 2019 due to Chilkat River king salmon conservation concerns.

Anglers sport fishing for king salmon are required to purchase a 2019 king salmon stamp in addition to a 2019 sport fishing license. Exceptions to this requirement are listed on pages 4 – 5 of the Southeast Alaska Sport Fishing Regulations Summary. Sport fishing licenses and king salmon stamps can be obtained online at www.adfg.alaska.gov/store.

Minnesota Represented Twice In The Valdez Halibut Derby Top Three

Christina Ives continues to lead the Valdez Halibut Derby (285 pounds, 6 ounces). (VALDEZ FISH DERBIES)

 

The following is courtesy of Valdez Fish Derbies:

TWO ANGLERS FROM MINNESOTA ON THE LEADER BOARD

VALDEZ, Alaska – It was a good week in Valdez for Minnesota anglers Christopher Barnes and Matt Janezic who both reeled in fish over the 200 pound mark. Christopher Barnes of Moorhead, Minnesota reeled in a 225.6 pound halibut June 14th aboard the SeaQuester. His fish won him the 1st place weekly prize and he is currently in 2nd place overall. Matt Janezic of Duluth Minnesota reeled in a 203.4 pound halibut June 28th aboard the Bold Eagle to take home the 2nd place weekly prize and drop into 3rd place in the overall standings. Christine Ives of Fairbanks, Alaska is still leading the Valdez Halibut Derby with the 285.6 pound halibut she caught June 6th aboard the Nunatak.

Christopher Barnes of Moorhead. Minnesota moved into second place overall (225 pounds, 6 ounces).

Valdez Fishing Report interviewer Laurie Prax said she talked to a huge number of Minnesotans this week and many of them were travelling with friends and family who live in Fairbanks. “With the sunny weather and clear skies we have been having in Valdez, anglers were just as happy to get out of the smoke in Fairbanks and the Anchorage area as they were to catch fish”, said Prax.

Duluth, Minnesota’s Mat Janezic (203-4) sits in third overall.

Prax caught up with Matt Janezic at the Valdez Dock and found out that he has been fishing in Valdez for the last 12 years and won a weekly prize in the Valdez Halibut Derby a few years ago. When asked why he kept coming back to Valdez, Janezic responded, “We love a lot of things. The scenery is second to none. The fish variety is great. We have fished out of a lot of other ports in Alaska and Valdez in particular it seems we get a larger size and quality of fish”. While Janezic has always picked up halibut and rockfish when fishing out of Valdez, on Saturday he got an extra bonus as they caught a King salmon as well.

Halibut anglers have been quite successful catching their limit of halibut and are bringing in good catches of rockfish. Lingcod season opened officially July 1st and halibut charter captains are seeing lots of pink salmon. According to the Valdez Fisheries Development Association website, the anticipated return of pink salmon to Port Valdez is 20 million this summer.

Valdez Fish Derbies is hosting a free Kids Pink Salmon Derby on Saturday, July 20th. The Valdez Silver Salmon Derby starts July 20th so there will be a few weeks where anglers can catch both pink and silver salmon in Valdez.

The Women’s Silver Salmon Derby is slated for August 10th with an opening ceremony Friday night. The theme of this year’s Women’s Derby is “Pajama Party” and there will be a group costume contest Friday night as well as live music and awards for the top 50 on Saturday night. CLICK HERE for details on the Women’s Derby.


Halibut Derby – Overall Leaders

1st        Christine Ives              Fairbanks, AK            285.6 lbs.         June 6              Nunatak
2nd       Christopher Barnes     Moorhead, MN           225.6 lbs.         June 24            Sea Quester
3rd        Matt Janezic                Duluth, MN                 203.4 lbs.         June 28            Bold Eagle

Halibut Derby – Weekly Winners – June 24th through 30th

1st        Christopher Barnes     Moorhead, MN           225.6 lbs.         June 24            Sea Quester
2nd       Matt Janezic                Duluth, MN                 203.4 lbs.         June 28            Bold Eagle

Buskin River Sockeye Salmon Limits Increased

Buskin River photo by ADFG

 

The following is courtesy of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game:

(Kodiak) – The Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) is implementing the following sport fishing regulation liberalization by increasing the bag limit for sockeye salmon to 5 per day and 5 in possession, of which all five may be sockeye salmon in the Buskin River drainage. This regulatory change is effective 12:01 a.m. Friday, June 28 through 11:59 p.m. Tuesday, December 31, 2019.

As of June 26, 2019, 7,114 sockeye salmon have passed the weir. The escapement goal for sockeye salmon into the Buskin River drainage is 5,000 to 8,000 fish. Typically, about 65% of the run has occurred and the spawning escapement is projected to exceed the upper end of the escapement goal for this stock. Therefore, it is warranted to increase the bag limit for sockeye salmon to provide additional angler opportunity and attempt to achieve escapement goals for this system.

“While the Buskin River sockeye run started off very slow, a large push of fish has entered the river in the last week,” stated Area Management Biologist Tyler Polum. “Now we’re projecting to exceed the upper end of the escapement goal and can increase the bag limit to 5 per day. It’s a great chance for anglers to get out with their families and catch some sockeye.”

For additional information, please contact the Division of Sport Fish Kodiak Office at (907) 486-1880.

Campbell Creek Youth-Only King Fishery Opening (Updated)

The following is courtesy of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game:

(Anchorage) – The 2019 Youth-Only Fishery for king salmon on Campbell Creek in Anchorage will take place from 6:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. on Saturday, June 29 and Sunday, June 30, 2019.

Anglers who are 15 years of age and younger will have a chance to fish for king salmon on Campbell Creek between Dimond Boulevard and the Old Seward Highway. Youth anglers do not need a sport fishing license or king salmon stamp but do need a Harvest Record Card. Any king salmon harvested must be recorded immediately on a Harvest Record Card. While adults can assist youth anglers in landing a fish, this section of Campbell Creek is closed to all fishing, including catch-and-release, for anglers 16 and older during this time. As with all fisheries in Alaska, the fish belongs to the angler that sets the hook.

Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) staff and volunteers will be at the Taku-Campbell Lake parking lot off East 76th Avenue and King Street to help young anglers, from approximately 6:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. on Saturday, June 29, 2019. Fishing rods will also be available for kids to check out and use on a first come basis during this timeframe. ADF&G staff conducted a stream survey on Monday, June 24 and counted 44 king salmon in the area open to kids.

“We always like anglers to be successful and for that stretch of the Campbell Creek the fish count was lower than we would like to see,” stated Area Management Biologist Jay Baumer. “To increase the kid’s success, I would recommend hitting the creek early and plan on doing a lot of walking to search out those kings.

The harvest limits for king salmon 20 inches or greater is one per day and one in possession. These kings count toward the Cook Inlet regional annual limit of five king salmon, 20 inches or longer. The harvest limit for king salmon less than 20 inches is five per day and five in possession. Campbell Creek is closed to fishing for other species of salmon at this time. Bait is allowed during this time; however, snagging is never allowed.

Kids may also find rainbow trout and Dolly Varden in the creek. The limits for rainbow trout and Dolly Varden in Campbell Creek are five per day and five in possession for each species. Only one of the rainbow trout can be over 20 inches and only one of the Dolly Varden can be over 12 inches.

For additional information, please contact the Anchorage Sport Fish Information Center at (907) 267-2218.

Campbell Creek Youth-Only King Salmon Fishery June 29 and 30

Update:

Situk, Lost, And Ahrnklin River Sockeye Salmon Bag Limit Reduced To One Fish

(Yakutat) – The Alaska Department of Fish and Game announced today that beginning July 1, the bag and possession limits for sockeye salmon on the Situk, Lost and Ahrnklin Rivers have been reduced to one fish per day, two in possession.

The Situk River drainage is managed for a biological escapement goal (BEG) of 30,000 to 70,000 sockeye salmon, with a management target of 50,000 sockeye salmon. As of June 26, 2019, 7,964 sockeye salmon have been counted through the Situk River weir. Given the low numbers of sockeye salmon returning to the Situk River, the BEG is not expected to be achieved without reduced harvest of sockeye salmon in the Situk River sport fishery.

Anyone needing further information concerning this announcement please contact Matt Catterson, Yakutat Area Sport Fish Biologist at (907) 784-3222.

2019-20 Federal Duck Stamps Available For Purchase On Friday

The following press release is courtesy of Ducks Unlimited:

 

MEMPHIS, Tennessee – June 26, 2019 – The new 2019-2020 federal duck stamp goes on sale Friday, June 28. The stamps, which cost $25, are valid from July 1, 2019, through June 30, 2020.

Purchased by millions of waterfowl hunters, wildlife enthusiasts and stamp collectors every year, duck stamps purchases provide critical funding to purchase and protect wetlands and associated habitat for ducks, geese and other wildlife species.

“Duck stamps are a great way for hunters, conservationists and outdoor enthusiasts to invest in wetland and waterfowl conservation,” said DU CEO Adam Putnam. “Whether you hunt or not, buy one or more duck stamps every year to help conserve our wetlands. The federal duck stamp program raises millions of dollars used to purchase and protect wetland habitat in the National Wildlife Refuge System. These habitats benefit waterfowl and hundreds of additional species of wildlife.”

The theme of this year’s 80th annual Federal Duck Stamp is “Celebrating Our Waterfowl Hunting Heritage” and features a Wood duck and a decoy created by Scot Storm.

This year’s Junior Duck Stamp features a Harlequin duck by Nicole Jean. More than 3,000 junior duck stamps are sold annually for $5 each to help promote conservation education through art.

The duck stamp, more formally known as the Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamp, dates back to 1934. Since then, the program has raised more than $1 billion to help acquire and protect more than 6 million acres of habitat in the National Wildlife Refuge System.

A first day of sale ceremony for the federal and junior duck stamps will be held Friday at Bass Pro Shops, 1935 South Campbell Avenue, Springfield, Missouri, from 10 a.m. to noon. Ducks Unlimited CEO Adam Putnam and DU COO Nick Wiley will attend the ceremony to represent more than a million DU supporters across the country.

Waterfowl hunters age 16 and older are required to purchase and carry a duck stamp while hunting. A duck stamp also provides free admission to national wildlife refuges (NWRs) that are open to the public. Duck stamps are sold at post offices nationwide and at many NWRs and sporting goods stores. Electronic versions of the duck stamp can also be purchased online – visit https://www.fws.gov/birds/get-involved/duck-stamp/e-stamp.php for more information.

Ducks Unlimited Inc. is the worlds largest nonprofit organization dedicated to conserving North America’s continually disappearing waterfowl habitats. Established in 1937, Ducks Unlimited has conserved more than 14 million acres thanks to contributions from more than a million supporters across the continent. Guided by science and dedicated to program efficiency, DU works toward the vision of wetlands sufficient to fill the skies with waterfowl today, tomorrow and forever. For more information on our work, visit www.ducks.org.

Football, Alaska Icon Larry Csonka Still Going Strong

 

Our pal Larry Csonka, a Pro Football Hall of Famer who has found bliss in Alaska – we profiled him in a 2014 cover story – was profiled by the team he had his greatest football years with, the Miami Dolphins. Csonka continues to cheer for Miami and his vocal about his love for the ‘Fins on his Twitter feed:

Here’s a bit of the latest Csonka feature about his love  for Alaska on the Dolphins’ website: 

While he takes time to take in Alaska’s natural wonders — the mountains, the forests, the islands, the wildlife — the former Dolphins fullback remains as active today as when he was busy plowing opposing defenders with his distinctive punishing style.

Csonka has his very own ZONK! Channel, which can be found on his website, and offers videos of his previous outdoors TV shows — “North to Alaska” and “Csonka Outdoors” — as well as a series of “Path to Perfection” videos where he discusses the Dolphins’ memorable 1972 season.

“Professionally, in football, I wouldn’t change anything. As far as getting to Alaska, I would have liked to have done it a little sooner. But I did it soon enough and I still enjoy coming up here five or six months of the year and making Alaska my home.”

So happy to see Larry living the good life in the Last Frontier.

 

 

 

King Salmon Sportfishing To Close Below Situk River Weir

The following is courtesy of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game:

(Yakutat) – In order to protect the low number of king salmon returning to the Situk River, the Alaska Department of Fish and Game has temporarily increased the area closed to sport fishing downstream of the fish counting weir on the lower Situk River.

From June 28 to August 15 sport fishing is not allowed between regulatory markers located approximately 300 feet upstream of the Situk River weir (river mile 1.8) to markers located approximately 2,100 feet downstream of the weir. This portion of the river encompasses the entire “Rodeo Hole”.

The Situk River drainage is managed for a biological escapement goal (BEG) of 450 to 1,050 large king salmon, with a management target of 730 large king salmon. As of June 24, 2019, 46 large king salmon have passed through the Situk River weir. This emergency order protects king salmon holding in several pools downstream of the weir from incidental hooking and catch-and-release angling practices.

Anglers are reminded that the entire Situk River drainage is closed to sport fishing for king salmon. King salmon may not be targeted and any incidentally caught king salmon may not be removed from the water and must be released immediately.

Ayakulik River Drainage To Be Closed For King Fishing (Update)

The following press release is courtesy of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game:

(Kodiak) – In an effort to achieve escapement goals, the Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) is closing the Ayakulik River drainage to sport fishing for king salmon effective 12:01 a.m. Wednesday, June 26 through 11:59 p.m. Thursday, July 25, 2019. Sport fishing for king salmon on the Ayakulik River is closed and any king salmon caught incidentally while fishing for other species may not be removed from the water and must be released immediately. In addition, the use of bait is prohibited and only one, single hook, artificial lure may be used on the Ayakulik River to reduce incidental hooking mortality.

As of June 23, 2019, only 1,198 king salmon have passed the Ayakulik River weir. The escapement goal for king salmon into the Ayakulik River is 4,800 to 8,400 fish. Based on historical run timing, more than 50% of the run has occurred and ADF&G does not expect the final weir count to meet the escapement goal for this stock. Therefore, it is warranted to close the king salmon sport fishery in an attempt to meet escapement objectives.

“The Ayakulik River king salmon stock has failed to meet the escapement goal for several years now,” stated Area Management Biologist Tyler Polum. “As long as we’re in this period of low productivity, we need to manage conservatively to get king salmon upriver to spawn.”

For additional information, please contact the Division of Sport Fish Kodiak Office at (907) 486-1880.

Update: 

Little Susitna River Open to King Salmon Fishing

(Palmer) – The Alaska Department of Fish and Game is implementing the following sport fishing regulation by reopening the Little Susitna River drainage to sport fishing for king salmon, seven days per week, from its mouth upstream to the Parks Highway effective 6:00 a.m. Wednesday, June 26 through the remainder of the king salmon sport fishing season, which closes 11:00 p.m. Saturday, July 13, 2019. The bag and possession limit for king salmon, 20 inches or greater, is one per day, one in possession. Only unbaited, artificial lures are allowed. Anglers are reminded a king salmon stamp is required in addition to their Alaska sport fishing license to fish for king salmon.

As of June 24, 2019, 2,615 king salmon have passed the Little Susitna weir and the sustainable escapement goal (SEG) of 2,300 – 3,900 king salmon has been achieved. The run is still shaping up to be below average, but strong enough to allow the sport fishery to proceed by regulation. Historically approximately 60% of the run has passed upstream of the weir by this date and over 75% of the harvest. An anticipated harvest of 350 fish upstream of the weir due to this action is not expected to reduce the spawning escapement below the SEG.

“This year’s run has taken an unexpected, but pleasant turn for the better, with a jump in counts over this past weekend,” stated Area Management Biologist Sam Ivey. “With the goal achieved we can relax restrictions on the Little Su and provide another opportunity for anglers to go catch a king salmon”.

For additional information, please contact Area Management Biologist Sam Ivey at (907) 746-6300.