Category Archives: Featured Content

U.S. Army Corps Of Engineers Extends Pebble Mind Comment Period

With urging from Alaska Republican Senators Lisa Murkowski and Dan Sullivan, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has extended the Pebble Mine comment period for an additional 30 days, meaning public comments can be submitted through June 29.

Also, it’s been reported that the Pebble Partnership spent $4.4 million in Washington lobbying since President Trump took office after the 2016 election. The news of both items has brought out a lot of social media reactions:

 

 

 

King Salmon Fishing To Close On Yukon River Drainage

The following press release is courtesy of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game: 

 

The Division of Sport Fish is closing the Yukon River drainage (excluding the Tanana River drainage) to sport fishing for king salmon, effective 12:01 a.m. Saturday, May 11, 2019. All king salmon caught incidentally while fishing for other species may not be removed from the water and must be released immediately.

King salmon stocks throughout western Alaska are continuing to experience a period of low productivity and, since at least 2010, below average run strength. The 2019 preseason outlook indicates that the Yukon River king salmon run in 2019 will be below average, with very little harvestable surplus available. In the past 11 years the interim management escapement goal for king salmon passage into Canada has not been attained or has only been attained due to extremely conservative management, including subsistence fishing closures or severe restrictions to subsistence fishing opportunity, complete closure of directed commercial fishing and no sale of king salmon caught during chum salmon commercial fishing periods, and sport fishery closures.

Under the 2019 preseason management strategy, the subsistence fishery for king salmon is likely to be restricted with the first arrival of king salmon in District 1. Restrictions may be implemented chronologically in each district with the upriver migration of king salmon. No sale of incidentally-caught king salmon in the directed commercial chum salmon fishery will be permitted until run strength is indicated to be at the upper end of the forecast. The use of selective fishing gear (dip nets, beach seines, and closely attended fish wheels) will be required during the early commercial summer chum salmon fishery openings that occur; king salmon caught incidentally during these periods must be released immediately to the water alive. The anticipated below average abundance of king salmon into the Yukon River, and restrictions placed on the subsistence fishery, warrant a closure of sport fishing for king salmon in the Yukon River drainage. If inseason stock assessment information indicates that run strength will be at the upper end of the forecast, and a majority of the king salmon escapement goals and subsistence needs in the Yukon River drainage will be met, restrictions will be relaxed.

For additional information contact Lisa Stuby, Yukon Area Management Biologist, 907-459-7202.

2019 Lingcod Regulations Set In Several S.E. Alaska Locales

ADFG photo

The following press releases are courtesy of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game:

2019 Lingcod Sport Fishing Regulations Set For The Northern Southeast Alaska Area

The Alaska Department of Fish and Game announced today that the lingcod sport fishing seasons, bag and possession limits, annual limits, and size limits have been established for the Northern Southeast Area (see attached map). In this area the following regulations apply:

Northern Southeast Area

  • Season: May 16 – November 30
  • Limits:
    • Residents – 1 daily, 2 in possession, no size limit.
    • Nonresidents – 1 daily, 1 in possession, size limit: 30 to 35 inches in length or 55 inches or greater in length. Annual limit of 2 fish, one of which is 30 to 35 inches in length, and one of which is 55 inches or greater in length.
      • Nonresident anglers shall immediately record the date and location (body of water fished), in ink, of all lingcod harvested either on the back of their sport fishing license or on their nontransferable harvest record.
  • Charter operators and crew members may not retain lingcod while clients are on board the vessel.

These regulations are also outlined on page 11 within the Southeast Alaska 2019 Sport Fishing Regulations Summary. The Southeast Alaska 2019 Sport Fishing Regulation Summaries are available at most sport fishing license vendors, all local ADF&G Sport Fish Division offices, and online at http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/static/regulations/fishregulations/PDFs/southeast/2019se_sfregs_general_saltwater.pdf

These regulations are designed to ensure that the sport harvest of lingcod stays within the sport fishery allocations established by the Board of Fisheries.

For further information, contact the nearest ADF&G office or visit:
http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/sf/EONR/index.cfm?ADFG=Region.R1

Southeast Alaska 2019 Lingcod Sport Fishing Regulations Set For The Northern Southeast Alaska Area

 

Southeast Alaska 2019 Lingcod Sport Fishing Regulations Set For The Yakutat Area

The Alaska Department of Fish and Game announced today that the lingcod sport fishing seasons, bag and possession limits, annual limits, and size limits have been established for the Yakutat Area (see attached map). In this area the following regulations apply:

Yakutat Area

  • Season: May 16 – November 30
  • Limits:
    • Residents – 1 daily, 2 in possession, no size limit.
    • Nonresidents – 1 daily, 1 in possession, size limit: 30 to 50 inches in length, or 55 inches or greater in length. Annual limit of 2 fish, one of which is 30 to 50 inches in length and one of which is 55 inches or greater in length.
      • Nonresident anglers shall immediately record the date and location (body of water fished), in ink, of all lingcod harvested either on the back of their sport fishing license or on their nontransferable harvest record.
  • Charter operators and crew members may not retain lingcod while clients are on board the vessel.

These regulations are also outlined on page 16 within the Southeast Alaska 2019 Sport Fishing Regulations Summary. The Southeast Alaska 2019 Sport Fishing Regulation Summaries are available at most sport fishing license vendors, all local ADF&G Sport Fish Division offices, and online at http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/static/regulations/fishregulations/PDFs/southeast/2019se_sfregs_yakutat.pdf.

These regulations are designed to ensure that the sport harvest of lingcod stays within fishery allocations established by the Alaska Board of Fisheries.

For further information, contact the nearest ADF&G office or visit:
http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/sf/EONR/index.cfm?ADFG=area.list&Year=2019&AreaID=18

Southeast Alaska 2019 Lingcod Sport Fishing Regulations Set For The Yakutat Area

 

Southeast Alaska 2019 Lingcod Sport Fishing Regulations Set For The Southern Southeast Alaska Area

The Alaska Department of Fish and Game announced today that the lingcod sport fishing seasons, bag and possession limits, annual limits, and size limits have been established for the Southern Southeast Area (see attached map). In this area the following regulations apply:

Southern Southeast Area

  • Season: May 16 – November 30
  • Limits:
    • Residents – 1 daily, 2 in possession, no size limit.
    • Nonresidents – 1 daily, 1 in possession, size limit: 30 inches to 45 inches in length, or 55 inches or greater in length. Annual limit of 2 fish, one of which is 30 to 45 inches in length, one of which is 55 inches or greater in length.
      • Nonresident anglers shall immediately record the date and location (body of water fished), in ink, of all lingcod harvested either on the back of their sport fishing license or on their nontransferable harvest record.
  • Charter operators and crew members may not retain lingcod while clients are on board the vessel.

These regulations are also outlined on page 11 within the Southeast Alaska 2019 Sport Fishing Regulations Summary. The Southeast Alaska 2019 Sport Fishing Regulation Summaries are available at most sport fishing license vendors, all local ADF&G Sport Fish Division offices, and online at http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/static/regulations/fishregulations/PDFs/southeast/2019se_sfregs_general_saltwater.pdf

These regulations are designed to ensure that the sport harvest of lingcod stays within the sport fishery allocations established by the Board of Fisheries.

For further information, contact the nearest ADF&G office or visit:
http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/sf/EONR/index.cfm?ADFG=Region.R1

Southeast Alaska 2019 Lingcod Sport Fishing Regulations Set For The Southern Southeast Alaska Area

The Wild Film Premiering In The Seattle Area

The following is courtesy of our friend Mark Titus, director of The Breach and his upcoming film, The Wild:

With Gratitude,

If you’ve ever supported the creation of this film with your time, talent or treasure, you know who you are. There are too many names to fit in this letter.  And too much gratitude in my heart to fit on this page. Please join me, our production team and esteemed luminaries at the 2019 Seattle International Film Festival – and let us thank you in person.

In Wildness,
~Mark 

Details

The Wild World Premiere will celebrate three screenings:

Sunday May 19th at the Egyptian Theatre on Capitol Hill
Tuesday May 21st at The Majestic Bay Theatre in Ballard
Saturday May 25th at Shoreline Community College

Purchase Tickets

No Bull: Air Traveler Carries On Moose Doo-Doo

ADFG photo

Um, here’s the Anchorage Daily News: 

Transportation Security Administration screening equipment flagged a “large organic mass” in a traveler’s carry-on April 15. TSA spokesperson Lisa Farbstein said that can mean explosives.

“The TSA officers opened the bag, they saw the moose poop inside,” Farbstein said after talking with the local officers. “And the passenger told the TSA officers that he collects this and likes to present it, ‘For politicians and their bleep policies.’ ”

Fair enough, but I wonder how his seat mates on the plane coped with it. The internet set was certainly enterained as, B.S. like this – or maybe it’s more like M.S. – is eaten up online.

 

ADFG Ends Freshwater Sportfishing Log Book Requirements

The following press releases are courtesy of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game:

Freshwater Sport Fishing Guide Logbooks No Longer Required

(Juneau) – The Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) is ending the freshwater sport fishing guide logbook program effective May 26, 2019. Sport fishing guide businesses will no longer need to obtain and complete freshwater logbooks, and freshwater sport fishing guides will no longer be required to complete a logbook sheet at the conclusion of each fishing trip. However, this will not eliminate the guide/business registration or vessel registration requirement for freshwater guides and businesses. In order to provide freshwater sport fishing services and freshwater sport fishing guide services, a business and guide must be registered with ADF&G and the vessels used to provide these services must be registered and have the annual sticker in place.

This action was a result of ADF&G’s budget reduction process. Previously, the freshwater logbook program was funded by an industry license fee, that enabled it to be a self-supporting program. Until legislation is adopted that re-implements a freshwater guide/business license fee, there will likely be no freshwater logbook program. The saltwater logbook program will remain in place since ADF&G has agreed to provide that data for Southeast Alaska king salmon treaty obligations and federal halibut management actions.

For additional information, please contact Division of Sport Fish Deputy Director Tom Taube at (907) 465-6184.

Yentna Subsistence Fishery Restricted

(Palmer) – In favor of protecting returning king salmon and ensuring fishing opportunities in the future, the Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) is restricting the Upper Yentna subsistence fishery to Wednesdays and Fridays each week during the month of June, effective 4:00 a.m. Monday, June 3 through 11:59 p.m. Sunday, June 30, 2019. This fishery is located in the mainstem of the Yentna River from Martin Creek upstream to the confluence with the Skwentna River.

This fishery restriction follows two sport fishing emergency orders issued on January 7, 2019, closing the Susitnaand Little Susitna rivers to king salmon fishing. Those sport fisheries were closed in anticipation of a run size less than experienced in 2017 and 2018, when nearly all escapement goals were missed. In addition, the Northern District commercial king salmon fishery will also be closed. Therefore, restricting the Upper Yenta subsistence fishery to two periods per week, helps to share the burden of conservation across all user groups while recognizing a subsistence priority.

“Preseason forecasts for the Cook Inlet king salmon fishery suggests another weak return of king salmon this season. Preseason conservation measures are being taken by all user groups and across the state,” stated Area Management Biologist Sam Ivey. “The Cook Inlet king salmon is just one fishery ADF&G is taking preseason measures by restricting or closing the fisheries, in order to, ensure the greatest number of wild king salmon returning to the rivers to spawn.”

2019 Copper River Personal Use Dip Net Salmon Fishery Preseason Schedule

In accordance with the Copper River Personal Use Dip Net Salmon Fishery Management Plan (5 AAC 77.591) the preliminary 2019 schedule for the Chitina Subdistrict personal use dip net salmon fishery is listed in the table below. The schedule is based on projected daily sonar counts at the Miles Lake sonar and is designed to distribute the harvest throughout the run based on actual salmon abundance.

2019 Copper River Chitina Subdistrict Personal Use Salmon Fishery Preseason Schedule
Dates Fishing period
hours
Friday, June 7, 6:00 p.m. through Sunday, June 9, 11:59 p.m. 54
Monday, June 10, 12:01 a.m. through Sunday, June 16, 11:59 p.m. 168
Monday, June 17, 12:01 a.m. through Sunday, June 23, 11:59 p.m. 168
Monday, June 24, 12:01 a.m. through Sunday, June 30, 11:59 p.m. 168
Wednesday, July 3, 6:00 a.m. through Sunday, July 7, 11:59 p.m. 114
Monday, July 8, 12:01 a.m. through Monday, July 8, 11:59 p.m. 24
Tuesday, July 9, 6:00 p.m. through Sunday, July 14, 11:59 p.m. 126
Friday, July 19, 6:00 a.m. through Sunday, July 21, 11:59 p.m. 66
Friday, July 26, 12:01 p.m. through Sunday, July 28, 11:59 p.m. 60
Friday, August 2, 6:00 p.m. through Sunday, August 4, 11:59 p.m. 54
Monday, August 5, 12:01 a.m. through Monday, August 5, 11:59 p.m. 24
Tuesday, August 6, 6:00 a.m. through Sunday, August 11, 11:59 p.m. 138
Monday, August 12, 12:01 a.m. through Monday, August 12, 11:59 p.m. 24
Wednesday, August 14, 12:01 p.m. through Sunday, August 18, 11:59 p.m. 108
Monday, August 19, 12:01 a.m. through Saturday, August 31, 11:59 p.m. Continuous

Based on sonar counts, actual fishing times will be established through emergency order each week as per the Copper River Personal Use Dip Net Salmon Fishery Management Plan. The department may deviate from this plan, as it did in 2018, if passage by the Miles Lake sonar appears insufficient to meet wild stock spawning escapement. Travel time for salmon between the Miles Lake sonar and the Chitina Subdistrict is approximately two to three weeks; as a result, changes to the preliminary schedule will be announced approximately one week prior to the fishing period. After August 31, the fishery will remain open, by regulation, through September 30.

The 2019 Copper River forecast is 1.51 million wild and enhanced sockeye salmon and 55,000 king salmon http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/static/applications/dcfnewsrelease/1008960294.pdf. The inriver goal, for passage by the Miles Lake sonar, is 618,000–1.01 million salmon http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/static/applications/dcfnewsrelease/1026468392.pdf. This goal ensures sufficient passage for spawning escapement, subsistence, personal use and sport fishing needs, and hatchery brood stock.

All residents of Alaska qualify to participate in this personal use fishery. A Chitina Personal Use Salmon Fishery Permit and a resident Alaska sport fishing license are required. Both dip net permits and fishing licenses can be obtained online at https://www.adfg.alaska.gov/Store/. A $15 fee is charged for the Chitina Subdistrict personal use salmon fishery permit. Revenue from the fee supports the sanitation services at the fishery and trail maintenance from O’Brien Creek to Haley Creek.
The department urges dipnetters to respect the rights of private landowners in the area and familiarize themselves with the land ownership in the area before fishing. For information on access across private lands contact Chitina Native Corporation at (907) 823-2223 (https://chitinanative.com/obrien-creek-permit-program) or Ahtna, Inc at (907) 822-3476 (https://www.ahtna-inc.com/lands/).

Information regarding the fishery can be found at the ADF&G web site: http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm?adfg=PersonalUsebyAreaInteriorChitina.main. This site provides information regarding the Upper Copper River fisheries including: fishery descriptions and summaries, maps of the subdistricts, a listing of vendors that carry the permits, and links to the sonar numbers and fishing schedule emergency orders.

The current fishing schedule will be announced on the Chitina Fishery information line at 822-5224 (Glennallen), 459-7382 (Fairbanks), and 267-2511 (Anchorage). Please contact an information phone line prior to planning your trip to Chitina to ensure that the fishery will be open when you arrive. If you have any questions regarding the Chitina Subdistrict personal use fishery, please contact the ADF&G office in Glennallen at (907) 822-3309.

 

Discovery Channel Takes A Powerful Look At The Liberation Of World War II Death Camps

“They thought they had seen everything. And they had seen nothing.”

-Dr. Michael Berenbaum, Director Sigi Ziering Institute

Liberation Heroes: The Last Eyewitnesses, Discovery Channel’s hour-long special airing today about the Allied men and women who first discovered what was going on as Adolf Hitler’s Germany crumbled during the liberation of Europe, is an eye-opening look at one of World War II’s darkest twists.

Please watch this show if you can. It’s a powerful look at the horrors and atrocities that were committed in concentration camps scattered throughout Eastern Europe, told from the perspective of those who found what was left of the survivors and those who lost their lives in the genocide.

. Unbeknownst to those who were fighting to break the Third Reich’s stranglehold inside and outside Germany, millions of Jews and countless others of various ethnicities were suffering and dying. What they discovered shocked, saddened and appalled the liberators.  

Even decades later, the horrors these servicemen and -women had found after the Nazis were surrounded by the Red Army to the east and the U.S./British-led forces from the west and finally surrendered are difficult for them to comprehend. Their reactions after all these years – not to mention the secrets they withheld from loved ones after what they bore witness to – will break hearts.

Here’s Discovery’s press release on today’s premiere:

LOS ANGELES) – As part of USC Shoah Foundation’s 25th Anniversary commemoration, its Stronger Than Hate Initiative and in honor of Holocaust Remembrance Day, Discovery Channel will air the documentary, Liberation Heroes: The Last Eyewitnesses, Wednesday, May 1, at 7pm ET/4pm PT.

In the one-hour documentary, heroic veterans vividly share their World War II liberation experiences in their own words, drawing parallels between the past and the present. By illuminating the powerful stories of these key eyewitnesses, the film shares their cautionary tale of what can happen when insidious hatred remains unchecked.

The film makes use of a unique portion of USC Shoah Foundation’s Visual History Archive®, a collection of 55,000 testimonies of survivors and witnesses to the Holocaust and other genocidal events. Many of the interviews were recorded since 1994 with the organization established by Steven Spielberg after his experiences filming Schindler’s List.

“Discovery is proud to shine a light on these remarkable stories of heroism, which serve as a solemn reminder for audiences everywhere to never forget,” said David Zaslav, CEO, Discovery. “Liberation Heroes: The Last Eyewitnesses is a call to action to stand against hate in all forms. These stories remind us of what can happen when religious, racial and ethnic hatred is unbridled.”

Stephen D. Smith, Finci-Viterbi Executive Director of USC Shoah Foundation and Executive Producer of the documentary said, “Our work with Discovery Communications and their team at Discovery Education for more than five years around our educational programming has touched more than half a billion people worldwide. It is an honor to continue our efforts with Discovery to share the stories of the witnesses to history and deliver our Stronger Than Hate message to future generations.”

The film is made possible with the generous support of Mickey Shapiro, a longtime Executive Board member of the USC Shoah Foundation.

The documentary is directed by award-winning filmmaker Vanessa Roth, whose work has been honored with an Oscar®, a special Emmy® Award for social impact, and the Alfred I DuPont-Columbia Award, among others. Produced by veteran Emmy-nominated TV and news producer and executive Andy Friendly, and Produced by June Beallor, a Co-Founding Executive Director of Shoah Foundation — whose films have garnered numerous awards including an Oscar®, numerous Emmys® and the George Foster Peabody Award.

“The mission of the documentary is not only a celebration and remembrance of the last heroic eyewitnesses to one of mankind’s darkest moments, but it is also their enduring final plea and message to never stand idly by – and in the face of the dramatic rise of intolerance around the world, this message is more relevant than ever,” Friendly said.

Andy’s late father, Fred Friendly, was a celebrated broadcast journalist and former President of CBS News, as well as Edward R. Murrow’s partner. The late Friendly wrote about the horrors he experienced at Mauthausen while covering the war as a Master Sergeant in the Army. Fred Friendly’s historic “Mauthausen Letter” to his family and Murrow’s rarely heard radio report from Buchenwald are included in the documentary.

          

Liberation Heroes: The Last Eyewitnesses is presented by June Beallor Productions and Andy Friendly Productions in association with USC Shoah Foundation for Discovery Channel. The film is Directed by Vanessa Roth and Executive Produced by Mickey Shapiro, Stephen D. Smith, Andi Gitow, and Ceci Chan.

###

About Discovery Channel

Discovery Channel is dedicated to creating the highest quality non-fiction content that informs and entertains its consumers about the world in all its wonder, diversity and amazement. The network, which is distributed to 100.8 million U.S. homes, can be seen in 224 countries and territories, offering a signature mix of compelling, high-end production values and vivid cinematography across genres including, science and technology, exploration, adventure, history and in-depth, behind-the-scenes glimpses at the people, places and organizations that shape and share our world. For more information please visit www.discovery.com.

 

Elodea Outbreak Prompts Fishing Closure Of Alexander, Sucker Lakes

The following press release is courtesy of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game:

(Palmer) – The Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) is closing two remote lakes in the Alexander Creek watershed to sport fishing due to both lakes being almost entirely infested with elodea, an invasive freshwater aquatic Canadian waterweed plant. Due to the frequency of floatplane traffic on Alexander and Sucker lakes, and that elodea can reproduce from a single plant fragment, there is a high risk of elodea spreading to other waterbodies. Therefore, these lakes are closed to sport fishing effective 12:01 a.m. Wednesday, May 1 through 11:59 p.m. Thursday, October 31, 2019.

Elodea was likely first introduced into Alaska via illegal aquarium dumps where it established populations in the wild. It has since been moved to other waters by human-mediated means such as entanglements on boat props and floatplane rudders. Alexander Lake is a popular summer fly-in lake for northern pike, which is also an illegally introduced and invasive species in Southcentral Alaska. Closing Alexander and Sucker lakes to sport fishing has the potential to reduce floatplane traffic during the effective period of this emergency order, thereby reducing the potential for spreading elodea to other area lakes.

Successful eradication of elodea from the Alexander Creek watershed is imperative to prevent the spread of this highly invasive plant and to prevent the threat on pristine fish habitat in Southcentral Alaska. Due to the location of these lakes’, eradication will be expensive, and will require multiple years to complete. The Alaska Department of Natural Resources (DNR) is the management authority for invasive aquatic plants in Alaska and is the lead agency in charge of this project. However, because of the complexity and scale of this project, a multi-agency task force has been formed consisting of staff from DNR, ADF&G, Tyonek Tribal Conservation District, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Mat-Su Salmon Partnership, Cook Inlet Aquaculture, and lake residents in the area. Collectively, this task force is working to develop treatment plans and acquire permits and funding. While funds are sought to complete this eradication effort, containment of elodea to Alexander and Sucker lakes is of utmost importance and floatplanes will continue to remain a primary source for spreading elodea.

Additional information on elodea in Alaska, is available on the DNR Invasive Plants and Agricultural Pest Management webpage http://plants.alaska.gov/invasives/elodea.htm. Please report any additional sightings of elodea in Alaska via the ADF&G Invasive Species webpage https://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm?adfg=invasivespeciesreporter.main or by calling 1 (877) INVASIV.

Fishing for northern pike will re-open for the winter when ice-cover minimizes the chances of spreading elodea. Some alternative fly-in northern pike fishing locations include Figure Eight Lake, Flathorn Lake, Arrowhead Lake, Whitsol Lake, Whitsoe Lake, Upper and Lower Vern Lakes, Ladyslipper Lake, Lockwood Lake, Trail Lake, Bulchitna Lake, Sevenmile Lake, Onestone Lake, Shell Lake, Whiskey Lake, Hewitt Lake, Chelatna Lake, and Trapper Lake.

For additional information, please contact Invasive Species Research Biologist Krissy Dunker at (907) 267-2889.

Earthworks Requests Investigation Into Pebble Mine Company

The following press release is courtesy of Earthworks:

VANCOUVER & WASHINGTON D.C. — Today the Justice and Corporate Accountability Project (JCAP), on behalf of Earthworks, filed a request for a compliance investigation into Northern Dynasty Minerals (TSX: NDM, NYSE American: NAK). The letters to the British Columbia Securities Commission and the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission raise serious issues concerning misleading claims about  the proposed Pebble Mine in Bristol Bay, Alaska.

“Northern Dynasty refuses to accept that the Pebble Mine is a losing proposition,” said Bonnie Gestring, Earthworks’ Northwest Program Director. “Four major mining companies have already walked away from it. Now Northern Dynasty, which lacks the financial resources to build the mine, is trying to drum up cash by providing incomplete and misleading information to investors.”

The complaint shows that Northern Dynasty is misleading investors in four major ways:

  1. Misrepresentation of the amount of the mineral resource available for the Pebble mine project.
  2. Misrepresentation by the use of overly promotional language, such as “world class” and “generational opportunity.”
  3. Lack of disclosure concerning Alaska Native corporation’s ownership of subsurface rights along the proposed underground gas pipeline and stated refusal to grant Northern Dynasty access.
  4. Lack of disclosure concerning Alaska Native opposition and failure to secure social license.

Northern Dynasty’s investor materials promote a “world class” 11 billion tonne deposit, but the mine plan under review by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will extract only a small fraction of the mineral resource (11%). According to Dr. David Chambers, a geophysicist and mining expert who submitted a professional opinion with the complaint, the company’s plan to backfill the pit with mine waste and let it flood with wastewater after 20 years (the lifespan of the mine) will prevent any further mining in the open pit, and could deny access to all of the remaining 89% of the deposit.

“Northern Dynasty is touting a world class resource, but is proposing an unrealistic mine plan, and it isn’t being straight with investors,” Dr. Chambers said. “The company has also failed to provide the essential economic analysis to support its extravagant claims,” he added, pointing to the lack of a pre-feasibility or feasibility study to demonstrate economic viability.

The complaint also points to Northern Dynasty’s failure to disclose to its investors the subsurface rights held by the Bristol Bay Native Corporation (BBNC) along the mine’s proposed underground gas pipeline, and BBNC’s refusal to grant access to Northern Dynasty for pipeline development, which it stated in a 2018 letter to the Pebble Limited Partnership, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Northern Dynasty.

“The Pebble Mine is the only significant asset of Northern Dynasty, so these types of glaring misrepresentations and omissions must be investigated and properly disclosed to investors,” said Shin Imai, JCAP lawyer and professor emeritus at Osgoode Hall Law School in Toronto. 

The complaint also highlights Northern Dynasty’s failure to secure social license for Pebble from the indigenous peoples of Bristol Bay, including opposition from the United Tribes of Bristol Bay, a consortium of 15 Bristol Bay tribal governments that account for nearly 80% of the Bristol Bay Native population.

“A Pebble mine, big or small, cannot co-exist with our traditional way of life,” said Alannah Hurley, Executive Director of United Tribes of Bristol Bay, a consortium of 15 Bristol Bay tribal governments. “For almost two decades our people have stood against this mine.  We have no intention, now or ever,  to compromise our Native values for this destructive project.”

The Pebble mine plan is controversial because it is located at the headwaters of Alaska’s Bristol Bay watershed, which produces roughly half of the world’s supply of wild sockeye salmon.  The Draft Environmental Impact Statement predicts that over 70 miles of rivers and streams will be permanently lost, and the resulting open pit will contain more contaminated water (estimated 61 billion gallons) than the Berkeley Pit (estimated 50 billion gallons) – one of the largest Superfund sites in the United States.

FOR MORE INFORMATION

 

Pebble Mine Town Hall Tonight In Seattle

The following press release is courtesy of Commercial Fishermen For Bristol Bay: 

 


We are holding a Pebble Mine town hall TODAY, Thursday April 25, in Seattle at the UW Fisheries Auditorium. Pebble Mine is currently being pushed through the permitting process with what looks like a pre-determined outcome in its favor. All advocates for Bristol Bay need to show up if we are going to put a stop to this reckless, destructive proposal. Our panel tonight wil be there to explain where the mine is in the permitting process and what you can do to stop it. Join us today from 6:00 – 7:30 PM at the University of Washington Fisheries Auditorium at 1122 NE Boat St. RSVP here.  

Speakers will include:

Dr. Dan Schindler

One of the most prominent fisheries scientists in Bristol Bay and University of Washington biologist, he has been a leading voice in identifying the scientific deficiencies in the Pebble Mine permit application.

Nick Lee

An Alaska commercial fishing Alaskan waters for over thirty five years Nick has worn many hats in the fishing and seafood industry: deckhand, processor, logistics expert, international fish trader, international quality control expert. Nick worked as a buyer’s’ rep, fleet manager, and quality control for the Togiak Herring Fishery, and was elected twice to the board of the Bristol Bay Regional Seafood Development Association. He is the founder of Alaskan Select Seafoods, delivering high quality, nutritious seafood, from Alaska’s sustainably managed fisheries directly to the consumer.

Bring your questions, and get ready to take action to protect the wild fisheries and ecosystems you love. It’s going to be an informative and fun night.

 


Commercial Fishermen for Bristol Bay

Commercial Fishermen for Bristol Bay is a coalition of over 100 fishing organizations and thousands of individual fishermen working to protect the 14,000 jobs, more than $500 million in annual income, and over half the world’s wild sockeye salmon provided by Bristol Bay’s sustainable fishery.