Category Archives: Featured Content

Little Su, Deshka Rivers To Close For Coho Fishing

The following are courtesy of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game:

Little Susitna River Closed to Coho Salmon Fishing

(Palmer) – In an effort to increase the number of coho salmon passing through the Little Susitna River weir, the Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) is closing the Little Susitna River to fishing for coho salmon, including catch-and-release, from its mouth up to the Parks Highway effective 12:01 a.m. Wednesday, August 21 through 11:59 p.m. Monday, September 30, 2019. The use of bait continues to be prohibited. Gear used for other species is restricted to unbaited, artificial lures, meaning treble hooks or two hooks may be used.

“Extremely low water conditions has stalled upstream migration of coho salmon,” stated Palmer Area Management Biologist Sam Ivey. “It can be difficult to assess run strength by weir under these conditions. Reports from guides and anglers also indicate below average numbers of fish holding in the lower 30 miles of the river. It is prudent to conserve the remaining coho salmon until environmental conditions change and the indications of run strength improve.”

The Little Susitna River coho salmon sustainable escapement goal (SEG) is 10,100–17,700 fish. To date, only 3,841 coho salmon have passed upstream of the weir.

Deshka River Closed to Coho Salmon Fishing

(Palmer) – In an effort to increase the number of coho salmon passing through the Deshka River weir, the Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) is closing the Deshka River to fishing for coho salmon, including all waters within a one-half mile radius of its confluence with the Susitna River effective 12:01 a.m. Wednesday, August 21 through 11:59 p.m. Monday, September 30, 2019. In addition, the use of bait is prohibited. Gear used for other species is restricted to unbaited, artificial lures, meaning treble hooks or two hooks may be used.

“Extremely low water levels coupled with high stream temperatures has stalled upstream migration of coho salmon,” stated Palmer Area Management Biologist Sam Ivey. “It can be difficult to assess run strength by weir under these conditions. Reports from guides and anglers and observations from staff also indicate below average numbers of fish holding in the mouth area and likely too low to achieve the escapement goal at this time. It is prudent to conserve the remaining coho salmon until environmental conditions change and the indications of run strength improve.”

The Deshka River coho salmon sustainable escapement goal (SEG) is 10,200 – 24,100 fish. To date, only 3,285 coho salmon have passed upstream of the weir.

USFWS Releases 2019 Waterfowl Breeding Survey

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service released its 2019 Waterfowl Breeding Surveys today.

Here’s some of the USFWS report with regards to Alaska waterfowl numbers:

In general, habitat conditions during the 2019 Waterfowl Breeding Population and Habitat Survey (WBPHS) were similar to or declined relative to 2018, with a few exceptions. Much of the Canadian prairies experienced below-average precipitation from fall 2018 through spring 2019. Fall and winter temperatures were mainly below average. Southern Alberta and Saskatchewan had a warm spell in December 2018 through January 2019 but February 2019 was brutally cold across all of the Canadian prairies. Spring temperatures were average to slightly below average.

The U.S. prairies experienced average to above-average precipitation over most of the region. Habitat conditions were generally drier near the North Dakota border with Canada. Conditions in much of the eastern survey area remained similar or improved relative to 2018. The region experienced mainly average to above-average precipitation in the south and Maritimes but below-average precipitation across the northern areas since September 2018.

The entire region tended to have a cool spring. Spring phenology and ice-out was generally normal but substantially delayed in northern Quebec and Labrador. Conditions for waterfowl production were good to excellent in the south and poorer farther north. Spring phenology was earlier than average across much of Alaska and the eastern Arctic and Subarctic, whereas spring snow and ice cover in the central and western Arctic and Subarctic were generally comparable to last year.

The total pond estimate (Prairie Canada and northcentral U.S. combined) was 5.0 ± 0.2 million, which was similar to the 2018 estimate of 5.2 ± 0.2 million and the long-term average of 5.2 ± 0.03 million.

The 2019 estimate of ponds in Prairie Canada was 2.9 ± 0.1 million. This estimate was 22% below the 2018 estimate of 3.7±0.1 million and 19% below the long-term average (3.5±0.02 million). The 2019 pond estimate for the northcentral U.S. was 2.1 ± 0.1 million, which was 36% above the 2018 estimate (1.6 ± 0.09 million) and 26% above the long-term average (1.7 ± 0.01 million). Spring phenology and timing of ice-out was normal or slightly delayed in places within the traditional survey area.

Alaska experienced above-average temperatures and below- to above-average precipitation in a northward gradient. The boreal forest experienced generally below-average precipitation and temperatures but December 2018 was warmer than average. Habitat quality generally declined across the survey area compared to last year, with the exception of most of the Dakotas and Montana which continued to improve. Overall habitat quality remained fair to good over a large portion of the traditional survey area and should lead to average waterfowl production this year, however dry areas, particularly in the Canadian prairies, have expanded since 2018.

Ducks Unlimited provided the actual numbers projected per species of birds:

Total populations were estimated at 38.9 million breeding ducks in the traditional survey area, 6 percent lower than last year’s estimate of 41.2 million and 10 percent above the long-term average (since 1955).

 

Valdez Silver Salmon Derby Hitting Home Stretch

Pravat Phumin of Valdez caught this 14.68-pound silver on the Seagull to currently hold the lead in the derby with two weeks left.. (VALDEZ FISH DERBIES)

The following is courtesy of Valdez Fish Derbies:

VALDEZ, Alaska – The Valdez Fish Derbies Weigh-In Station has been a busy place this past week with anglers hoping to get on the leader board in the Valdez Silver Salmon Derby. Pravat Phumin of Valdez is currently leading the derby with a 14.68 pound silver he caught August 13th aboard the Seagull 2. A 14.68 silver is a respectable fish but far from the weight of the fish that have won the $10,000 grand prize over the last few years. The Valdez Silver Salmon Derby features a daily 1st and 2nd place prize and the majority of daily winners have been in the 12 to 13 pound range. With just two weeks in the derby, there’s a good chance the $10,000 derby winner is still swimming in Prince William Sound.

The Valdez Silver Salmon Derby began in 1971 and the smallest winning fish on record in the Valdez Silver Salmon Derby was a 15.11 pound salmon caught that first year by Jim Burzinski. In the last 30 years of the Valdez Silver Salmon Derby, only two fish in the 15 pound range have won the derby. Only six fish weighing in at the 16 pound range have won the big money in the Valdez Silver Salmon Derby. The vast majority of winners have weighed in at 17 to 21 pounds. The Valdez Silver Salmon Derby runs through Sunday, September 1st at noon and there are prizes for the top 3 fish as well as daily prize winners. Tobey James Fisher of Tifton, Georgia is currently 2nd place in the Silver Salmon Derby with a 14.42 pound salmon he caught August 16th on the Kittywake. James Scheirel of Paynesville, Minnesota is holding onto 3rd place with a 13.88 pound silver he caught August 8th aboard the Sue Q.

In the Valdez Halibut Derby it looks like Christine Ives of Fairbanks has a lock on the $10,000 prize. She caught a 285.6 pound halibut June 6thaboard the Nunatak and has been in the lead ever since. Christopher Barnes of Moorhead, Minnesota is currently in 2nd place with a 225.6 pound halibut he caught June 24th aboard the Sea Quester. Joshua Curry of Valdez is holding onto 3rd place in the Halibut Derby with a 213.4 pound fish he caught July 21st aboard the Mistress.  Last year’s winning halibut was a 285.8 pound flatfish caught by Patricia Johnson of Clovis, California.

Silver salmon fishing has been productive at Gold Creek and Mineral Creek. The last two weeks of the derby should be good fishing from shore as well as from a boat. Both the Valdez Halibut and Silver Salmon derbies will end at noon on Sunday, September 1st.

Christina Ives continues to lead the Valdez Halibut Derby. Photo by Valdez Fish Derbies.

Halibut Derby – Overall Leaders

1st        Christine Ives              Fairbanks, AK            285.6 lbs.         June 6              Nunatak
2nd       Christopher Barnes     Moorhead, MN           225.6 lbs.         June 24            Sea Quester
3rd        Joshua Curry               Valdez, AK                 213.4 lbs.         July 21            Mistress

Halibut Derby – Weekly Winners

1st                Jeffrey Nettleton           Klamath Falls, OR        186.6 lbs.         Aug 16             The Reflection
2nd        Fred Augustin              Lake City, FL                146.2 lbs.         Aug 12             Sea Hunter

Silver Derby – Overall Leaders

1st        Pravat Phumin              Valdez, AK                  14.68 lbs.         Aug 13             Seagull 2
2nd        Tobey James Fisher      Tifton, GA                   14.42 lbs.         Aug 16             Kittywake
3rd        James Scheirel             Paynesville, MN           13.88 lbs.         Aug 8               Sue Q

Nonresidents Can Fish For Kings Again In Southeast AK

The folllowing is courtesy of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game:

Nonresident King Salmon Closure Rescinded August 16

(Juneau) – The Alaska Department of Fish and Game announced today, that the nonresident king salmon closure will be rescinded on August 16. Nonresident anglers may again retain king salmon in Southeast Alaska and Yakutat marine waters. These regulations will be effective 12:01 a.m. Friday, August 16, 2019 through 11:59 p.m. Tuesday, December 31, 2019. King salmon regulations for Alaska residents remain unchanged.

The regulations are:

  • Nonresident
    • The nonresident bag and possession limit is one king salmon, 28 inches or greater in length;
    • From August 16 through December 31, 2019, the annual harvest limit is one king salmon, 28 inches or greater in length, and any king salmon harvested earlier in 2019 apply toward the one fish annual harvest limit;
    • Immediately upon retaining a king salmon a nonresident must enter the species, date and location, in ink, on the back of their sport fishing license or on a nontransferable harvest record.
  • Alaskan Resident – unchanged
    • The resident bag and possession limit is one king salmon, 28 inches or greater in length. No annual limit.
    • Inside waters- from June 15 through December 31, 2019, the resident bag and possession limit is two king salmon, 28 inches or greater in length. No annual limit. For more information refer to news releases issued on June 10 for the Juneau, Petersburg/Wrangell and Ketchikan areas.

The king salmon nonretention periods for all anglers in the Haines/Skagway area, announced on January 7, 2019, are still in effect in order to protect wild Alaska king salmon stocks.

Regulations remain unchanged in the designated sport fish terminal hatchery areas in the vicinity of Juneau.

The Southeast Alaska king salmon sport fishery is managed under the directives of the Southeast Alaska King Salmon Management Plan (5 AAC 47.055). This plan prescribes management measures based upon the Southeast Alaska Winter Troll catch per unit of effort (CPUE). The Southeast Alaska Winter Troll CPUE for the 2019 season is 3.38 which equates to 25,844 king salmon allocated to the sport fishery. To address the implementation of the new treaty agreement which includes provisions to reduce the Alaska harvest ceiling the following year if the Alaska harvest ceiling is exceeded, the sport fishery is being managed conservatively with a harvest target of 25,300 treaty king salmon in 2019. As directed by the Southeast Alaska King Salmon Management Plan, nonresident anglers will be restricted to stay within the sport harvest allocation and the department shall only restrict resident anglers if nonresident angler restrictions are insufficient to remain within the sport harvest allocation. Based on harvest estimates to date and projected harvest of king salmon for the remainder of the season, a period of king salmon nonretention for nonresident anglers is no longer necessary to ensure that the sport fishery remains within its harvest allocation.

For further information regarding sport fisheries in Southeast Alaska, contact the nearest ADF&G office or visit: http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm?adfg=fishingSportFishingInfo.eonr

Youth-Only Eklutna Tailrace Coho Fishery Set For Aug. 17

The following is courtesy of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game:

Eklutna Tailrace Youth-Only Coho Salmon Fishery on August 17

(Palmer) – The 2019 Eklutna Tailrace Coho Salmon Youth-Only Fishery will take place from 6:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. on Saturday, August 17, 2019. The Eklutna Tailrace Youth-Only Fishery allows anglers 15 years and younger to fish from the confluence with the Knik River upstream to the pedestrian bridge. The Eklutna Tailrace is located at mile 3.5 on the Old Glenn Highway. Sections dedicated to this Youth-Only fishing are closed to anglers 16 years and up, including catch-and-release, but the remainder of the Tailrace will be open to fishing for anglers of all ages.

“We encourage adults to bring young anglers out to the Eklutna Tailrace on Saturday to give them a shot at catching coho salmon,” stated Assistant Area Management Biologist Samantha Oslund.

Remember, youth anglers do not need a sport fishing license. Anglers are allowed to use bait and multiple hooks, meaning no more than two single hooks or two treble hooks per line. While adults may assist youth anglers with baiting a hook, casting, and landing a fish, youth anglers need to set the hook themselves. The daily bag and possession limit is three coho salmon.

For additional information, please review page 40 of the 2019 Southcentral Alaska Sport Fishing Regulations Summary booklet or contact the ADF&G Palmer office at (907) 746-6300.

The Kid Is Alright! 12-Year-Old Wins Women’s Valdez Silver Derby

Valdez Women’s Silver Salmon Derby champion Maleah Chapin. (VALDEZ FISH DERBIES_

 

The following is courtesy of Valdez Fish Derbies:

12-YEAR-OLD WINS VALDEZ WOMEN’S SILVER SALMON DERBY

VALDEZ, Alaska – “Being crowned something or anything is just a bit shocking to me”, 12-year-old Maleah Chapin said after being crowned Queen of the Silver Salmon Sisterhood on Saturday in Valdez. Chapin caught a 13.46 pound silver salmon to take the top prize in the Valdez Women’s Silver Salmon Derby and was very emotional as she took the stage to receive her tiara and don the ceremonial pink bathrobe. As soon as 2nd place was announced at the Civic Center Saturday night Chapin and her family knew she was the winner. “Seeing how my mother’s face was, was really incredible. I love her so much,” Chapin said. “Whenever you see somebody and they get crowned for anything, you never think it’s a really big deal. When you actually get crowned, it’s like …wow!”

Chapin won $1,000 cash and $1,000 in prizes from Prospector Outfitters in addition to the tiara and bathrobe. When asked what she would do with the money she said she would use it for school. Chapin’s big fish also won the 1st place daily prize in the regular silver salmon derby and she is currently in 2nd place overall and could win more cash if her fish holds on through the end of the derby September 1st. Rowena Palomar of Valdez took 2nd place in the Women’s Derby, garnered herself the 2nd place daily prize and is currently holding 3rd place in the Silver Salmon Derby. The 3rd place winner in the Women’s Derby was 11-year-old Lily Lindquist of Peoria, Arizona who reeled in a 12.62 pound silver salmon. Lindquist commented. “I thought it was really small, but when it came out of the water it was huge.”

Silver salmon seem to be schooled up out at Goose Point and beyond and scattered just about everywhere in the Sound. “The seiners are really scattering the fish, but they always re-group and follow the shoreline in,” said Charter Captain Sanoe Deaver. “I have even fished at Entrance Island and they are jumping there and I have seen them there. They are working their way in.” Although fishing inside the Port and just outside the narrows was spotty and a bit sparse on Saturday, there was a top 10 fish caught from the shore at Allison Point in the Women’s Derby. Anglers should have great luck fishing from shore at Allison Point and in Port Valdez, the final weeks of the derby. The Valdez Silver Salmon Derby and Valdez Halibut Derby end Sunday, September 1st at noon.

In the Valdez Halibut Derby, Christine Ives of Fairbanks is still leading with the 285.6 pound halibut she caught June 6th. Christopher Barnes of Moorhead, Minnesota is currently in 2nd place overall with a 225.6 pound halibut and Joshua Curry of Valdez is holding onto 3rd place right now with a 213. 4 pound halibut.

Halibut Derby – Overall Leaders

1st        Christine Ives              Fairbanks, AK            285.6 lbs.         June 6              Nunatak
2nd       Christopher Barnes     Moorhead, MN           225.6 lbs.         June 24            Sea Quester
3rd        Joshua Curry               Valdez, AK                 213.4 lbs.         July 21            Mistress

Halibut Derby – Weekly Winners

1st                Thomasz Symanowski  Wasilla, AK                 181.6 lbs.         Aug 9               Jamie Lynn
2nd        Jake Simcik                  Still Water, MN            147.8 lbs.         Aug 5                Halibut Grove

Silver Derby – Overall Leaders

1st        James Scheirel             Paynesville, MN           13.88 lbs.         Aug 8               Sue Q
2nd        Maleah Chapin             Pasco, WA                   13.46 lbs.         Aug 10
3rd        Rowena Palomar          Valdez, AK                  13.34 lbs.         Aug 10

Valdez Women’s Silver Salmon Derby 2019 – TOP 50

1st Maleah Chapin Pasco, WA 13.46 lbs.
2nd Rowena Palomar Valdez, AK 13.34 lbs.
3rd Lily Lindquist Peoria, AZ 12.62 lbs.
4th Sherri Anderson Valdez, AK 12.48 lbs.
5th Beverly Reynolds Tijeras, NM 12.32 lbs.
6th Emily Chase Valdez, AK 11.70 lbs.
7th Verla Austin Wasilla, AK 11.70 lbs.
8th Bernadette Irish Valdez, AK 11.62 lbs.
9th Bonnie Saxum Valdez, AK 11.54 lbs.
10th Mary Stover Fairbanks, AK 11.44 lbs.
11th Bailey Bryant-Alexander Gillette, WY 11.38 lbs.
12th Sarah Sparks North Pole, AK 11.36 lbs.
13th Shelley Greenwood Anchorage, AK 11.24 lbs.
14th Kamille Sickels Grangeville, ID 11.18 lbs.
15th Rachel Sutton Valdez, AK 11.14 lbs.
16th Virginia Miller Shoreview, MN 11.08 lbs.
17th Shannon Heaps Eagle River, AK 11.00 lbs.
18th Sharon Lais Slayton, MN 10.88 lbs.
19th Moya Pilo Quito, Ecuador 10.82 lbs.
20th Jaruwan Kaewprasert Anchorage, AK 10.76 lbs.
21st Margaret Chesley Spokane, WA 10.70 lbs.
22nd Sheila Lint Delta Junction, AK 10.68 lbs.
23rd Tammy Hill Valdez, AK 10.66 lbs.
24th Lori Campbell Fairbanks, AK 10.64 lbs.
25th Brenda Roberts Sioux Falls, SD 10.62 lbs.
26th Chris Palmenberg Arlington, WA 10.62 lbs.
27th Cynthia Clements Valdez, AK 10.60 lbs.
28th Hayley Nielsen Surprise, AZ 10.60 lbs.
29th Jolene Hoeb Columbus, OH 10.54 lbs.
30th Kaidenn Meyers Cottonwood, AZ 10.50 lbs.
31st Tori Waterfield New Port News, VA 10.42 lbs.
32nd Signe Towne Valdez, AK 10.34 lbs.
33rd Kelsey Galfo Valdez, AK 10.32 lbs.
34th Brittany Lais Big Lake, AK 10.32 lbs.
35th Caitlin Neahr Valdez, AK 10.30 lbs.
36th Elaine Jamerson Ellensburg, WA 10.30 lbs.
37th Lynda Hernandez Anchorage, AK 10.28 lbs.
38th Denise O’Brien Valdez, AK 10.28 lbs.
39th Terri Olsen Fairbanks, AK 10.26 lbs.
40th Anne Branshaw Valdez, AK 10.24 lbs.
41st Shawana Glade North Pole, AK 10.20 lbs.
42nd Sarah Arts Eagle River, AK 10.18 lbs.
43rd

 

Slow Coho Run Prompts ADFG To Close Little Susitna To Bait Fishing

The following is courtesy of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game:

(Palmer) – In an effort to increase the number of coho salmon passing through the Little Susitna River weir, the Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) is prohibiting the use of bait on the Little Susitna River from its mouth up to the Parks Highway effective 12:01 a.m. Wednesday, August 14 through 11:59 p.m. Monday, September 30, 2019.

“The coho run on the Little Su has slowed,” stated Palmer Area Management Biologist Sam Ivey. “Using bait is a very effective way to target coho. By limiting the use of bait, we’re increasing the potential to achieve the escapement goal while still allowing opportunity for harvest.”

Anglers can fish for coho salmon in the Little Susitna River from its mouth up to the Parks Highway using artificial lures or flies. Multiple hooks, meaning no more than two treble hooks or two single hooks per line may be used in this section. Anglers are reminded that the bag and possession limit for coho salmon, 16 inches or longer, is two fish. A coho salmon that is removed from the water becomes part of the bag limit of the person who originally hooked the fish. In addition, a person who takes a bag limit of coho salmon in the Little Susitna River may not fish for any species of fish from the mouth up to the Parks Highway on that same day. Please review page 42 of the 2019 Southcentral Sport Fishing Regulation Summary booklet for additional regulatory information on the Little Susitna River.

The Little Susitna River coho salmon sustainable escapement goal (SEG) is 10,100 – 17,700 fish. Current weir countsare well below average. By August 6, 2019, as much as 50 percent of the harvest has typically taken place in the sport fishery. As of August 11, only 3,635 coho salmon had passed upstream of the weir and the escapement is projected to be 8,653 fish.

Fish Creek Gets Increased Sockeye Fishing Opportunities (Updated)

The following is courtesy of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game:

(Palmer) – Due to a strong run of sockeye salmon into Fish Creek, the Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) is increasing the bag and possession limits for salmon, other than king salmon, 16 inches or greater in length to six per day and six in possession; however, no more than two salmon per day and in possession may be coho salmon, in all waters of Fish Creek open to salmon fishing. In addition, sport fishing on Fish Creek will be allowed seven days per week from 5:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. each day. These provisions are effective 5:00 a.m. Friday, August 9 through 11:59 p.m. Tuesday, December 31, 2019.

After taking a bag limit of salmon, a person may not sport fish that same day in any waters open to salmon fishing. Bait and multiple hooks (meaning no more than two single hooks or two treble hooks per line) will be permitted in these fisheries.

“This year’s sockeye run to Fish Creek is solid and has exceeded the escapement goal of 15,000-45,000 fish,” stated Area Management Biologist Sam Ivey. “After a successful dipnet fishery followed by a great weekend of youth-only fishing, it’ll be nice to finish off the season by creating additional sport fishing opportunity for rod and reel anglers wishing to put up a few more fish for the winter.”

The escapement goal for coho salmon in Fish Creek is 1,200-4,400 fish and weir counts to date indicate 1,057 coho salmon have passed the weir at about 18% of the historical run. It is not anticipated that increased sport harvest of coho salmon as a result of increased fishing time directed at sockeye salmon harvest will prevent achieving the escapement for coho salmon in Fish Creek.

The Jim Creek coho salmon run is managed separately to achieve the escapement goal established for that system. Other Knik Arm waters, including the Little Susitna River, Eklutna Tailrace, and Wasilla and Cottonwood creeks remain unaffected by this emergency order.

Update:

Larson Creek Closed to Sport Fishing for All Salmon Species

(Palmer) – With low sockeye salmon numbers in Larson Creek, the Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) is prohibiting sport fishing for all salmon species in the Larson Creek drainage and within a one-quarter mile radius of its confluence with the Talkeetna River effective 6:00 a.m. Saturday, August 10 through 11:59 p.m. Tuesday, December 31, 2019.

“The run of sockeye to Larson Creek is winding down for the year,” stated Area Management Biologist Sam Ivey. “The sustainable escapement goal for Larson Creek is between 15,000 and 35,000 fish. As of August 7, 2019, the weir count was 3,041 sockeye salmon. We need to see more fish pass through the weir. Even if we use a record late run timing model, the projected escapement is less than what is required to achieve the escapement goal. Allowing harvest of sockeye to continue would further limit the number of fish in the creek and have an impact on the spawning population.”

Salmon may not be targeted, retained, or possessed and must be released immediately if caught incidentally. Sport fishing for and harvest of species other than salmon is not affected by this emergency order and may proceed 6:00 a.m. to 11:00 p.m. each day. Larson Creek is in Unit 5 of the Susitna River drainage. Additional regulatory information can be found on page 35 of the 2019 Southcentral Sport Fishing Regulation Summary booklet.

Celebrating Women And Hunting In Alaska

Christine Cunningham photo by Steve Meyer

Our former correspondent Christine Cunningham wrote a great piece in the Anchorage Daily News  on the stigma and blowback that women  sometimes face. Please read the entire story, but here’s a sampling of Cunningham’s points:

When I told a girlfriend I had gone duck hunting, she asked, “Why?”

At the time, my reason for going was to learn. The idea of hunting – not the reality – appealed to me as someone who eats meat and had not born any of the hands-on responsibility of obtaining it. I was also accustomed to sterile environments at work and at home. Everything on the duck flats was an affront to cleanliness and comfort. Yet, I fell in love with it. …

… It may be worth noting that women have been hunters for a very long time, and hunting has nothing to do with gender. Depending on why we hunt, our focus and our obligations change, and it’s less important how we identify ourselves than how we stay true to the reasons why we hunt.

Sockeye Limits Increased In Saltery Creek Weir

The following is courtesy of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game:

(Kodiak) – The recent number of sockeye salmon passing through the Saltery Creek weir is allowing the Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) to restore the bag and possession limits for sockeye salmon in the Saltery Cove drainage from two fish to five fish. These provisions are effective 12:01 a.m. Friday, August 9 through Tuesday, December 31, 2019.

“Sockeye salmon numbers have improved in the Saltery Cove drainage and ADF&G anticipates meeting the escapement objective for this drainage,” stated Area Management Biologist Tyler Polum. “As of August 5, 2019, the weir count was 16,215 sockeye salmon. Based on historical run timing, 95% of the run has occurred and escapement goals will be achieved even with increased harvest. With sockeye salmon escapement assured, restoring the bag limit to five fish per day will allow additional sport fishing and harvest opportunities.”