All posts by Chris Cocoles

GREEN MOUNTAIN PELLET GRILLS, BECAUSE FOOD TASTES BETTER COOKED OVER WOOD

THE FOLLOWING MATERIAL COMES FROM GREEN MOUNTAIN GRILLS

We discovered something we loved, REALLY loved. It was grilling with pellets…so much better than either charcoal or gas!

But the pellet grill we owned needed some improvements, so we decided to make our own! Then loved it so much we ended up starting our own company!

DB_ss

Green Mountain Pellet Grills is now the top-of-line … the best-of-the-best, but not the highest in price!

HOW IT WORKS

A motor turns an auger which feeds pellets into a firebox. There, a hot rod automatically ignites the pellets, and a combustion fan keeps them burning.

A fan inside the hopper maintains positive pressure which prevents burn-back in the auger tube. A sensor mounted inside the grill sends data to the on-board computer ten times every second, and the controller adjusts the air and pellet flow to maintain the temperature you set.

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IN GRILLING, TASTE RULES

The reason that pellet grills win far more than their fair share of BBQ competitions is that the food simply tastes better when cooked over real wood.

Propane has absolutely no taste, and the process of making briquettes destroys the flavor molecules in the wood they are made from.

Our pellets are made from clean, kiln-dried sawdust, with the flavor molecules totally intact!

And what could be easier than pushing a button – set it and forget it!

Now you can “turn pro” in your own back yard.

For more on Green Mountain Grills, see our website, greenmountaingrills.com

CRKT’s Release Of The Hi Jinx Knife

K280TXP

PRESS RELEASE
For immediate release
Contact: Lindsey Phelps, 1-800-891-3100 or 503-685-5015
Fax: 503-682-9680 E-mail: info@crkt.com

Tualatin, Oregon, U.S.A.— June 12, 2014

New knife released for collectors honored at the BLADE Show in Atlanta.

CRKT® released the limited edition Ken Onion-designed Hi Jinx™ knife at the 2014 BLADE Show in Atlanta and won the 2014 Overall Knife of the Year Award. Like some of the finest art prints, only a few are available to the public with 525 being built.

A high-end everyday carry knife for the distinguished gentleman, Ken spared no expense handcrafting it with only the finest materials. A 6AL4V titanium handle looks good to the eye while a modified drop point style blade made with Böhler-Uddeholm Sleipner blade steel looks good in use. The knife also features an easy-opening IKBS™ ball bearing pivot system to make this one of the smoothest flippers on the market. Crafted in Italy, the new Hi Jinx™ isn’t just a blade. It’s a work of art.

BL-14-Overall

 

The Hi Jinx™ knife manufacturer’s suggested retail price is $500.00.

 

PRODUCT SPECIFICATIONS

 

SKU:     K280TXP

Blade:    Edge: Plain

Length: 3.320” (84.3 mm)

Steel: Böhler-Uddeholm Sleipner, 58-59 HRC

Thickness: 0.200” (5.0 mm)

Finish: Satin

Closed:  4.780” (121.4 mm)

Open:     8.000” (203.2 mm)

Weight:  6.4 oz. (181.0 g)

Handle:  6AL4V Titanium

Style:      Folding Knife w/Frame Lock

Founded in 1994, CRKT® is the industry’s premier brand of knives, tools, and lifestyle accessories, with a reputation for innovative designs. For more information, call: (800) 891-3100, email: info@crkt.com, on the web: www.crkt.com.

LifeTank is a great way to store water for emergencies; won’t stagnify

Most people don’t realize you can’t live more than three days without water. This could be a serious problem if there is a disaster like Hurricane Katrina. This new storage tank stores three weeks of clean water that does not expire. Check out this video with the founder of LifeTank and the president of the company to hear about it works. Made in the U.S. Visit lifetanks.com for more information.

 

State Biologists Remove Bears For Subsistence Hunters

Photo by Tom Reale

Photo by Tom Reale

 

Moose meat is a need for subsistence hunters in the Alaskan Interior. So state wildlife biologists made the decision to shoot 64 bears (54 black bears and 10 grizzlies) in the Kuskokwim River area with the intention of maintaining the moose population for hunters who depend on the moose available to hunt.

From the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner:

It was the second year of a two-year predator control project requested by local villagers and endorsed by the Alaska Board of Game. Last year, biologists killed 89 bears (84 black and five grizzly) in what state wildlife officials called the “Bear Control Focus Area,” a 534-square mile area of state and private lands in game management unit 19A.

The area covers only a small part of the unit, which encompasses nearly 10,000 square miles upriver from Aniak in the western Interior. It is located along and south of the Kuskokwim River in what wildlife officials say used to be the best moose hunting are area in the unit.

But the moose population in unit 19A has declined in recent years and residents in villages have not been able to harvest moose in much of the unit for several years and much of the unit has been closed to hunting since 2006 because of low moose numbers, ADFG officials said in a news release issued Thursday.

 

Here’s the full ADFG release:

Unit 19A Predator Control Program Provides Meat for Western Interior Villages

Department of Fish and Game staff conducted the second year of a two-year predator control program May 13-24 in Unit 19A designed to increase the number and harvest of moose in the unit. The program was approved by the Board of Game at the request of local hunters concerned about low moose numbers.

ADF&G Staff members removed a total of 64 bears (54 black bears and 10 grizzlies) in the “Bear Control Focus Area,” 534 square miles of state and private lands within Game Management Unit 19A. Unit 19A encompasses nearly 10,000 square miles upriver from Aniak in western interior Alaska. The Bear Control Focus Area is located along and south of the Kuskokwim River in what formerly was the best moose hunting area in the Unit.

A total of 89 bears (84 black and 5 grizzly) were removed in the program in 2013. No sows with cubs were taken last year, but two black bear sows with cubs of the year were taken this spring.

Data collected this spring show excellent calf survival this past year, and more information will be available after moose composition surveys scheduled for November are completed.

“It’s too early for conclusions, but things look very good so far,” said Regional Management Coordinator Roy Nowlin.

Research in McGrath indicated that bear numbers should recover to pre-control levels within 5-7 years.

Residents of ten western Interior villages in Unit 19A received nearly three tons of bear meat as the result of the bear control program valued at approximately $60,000. More than four tons of meat was shared in the villages last year.

Department staff shot bears from a helicopter and brought them to Sleetmute, where the carcasses were skinned and meat was cut and placed in game bags. Department staff distributed the meat to the villages of Aniak, Chuathbaluk, Crooked Creek, Lime Village, Kalskag, Lower Kalskag, McGrath, Red Devil, Sleetmute, and Stony River.

“Again this year, local people really appreciated the meat,” said Nowlin. Hides of the smaller bears were also distributed to village residents. The larger hides will be sold at the annual auction of bears taken in defense of life or property.

The predator control program was designed with input from local residents and Fish and Game Advisory Committee members who support the effort. The moose population in Unit 19A is far below what the habitat can support, and data indicate that predation is preventing moose numbers from increasing and meeting the population and harvest objectives established by the Board of Game. People have not been able to harvest moose in much of the unit for several years and hunting opportunity is extremely limited. Much of Unit 19A has been closed to moose hunting since 2006.

A wolf control program has been in effect in the Unit since 2004, but reducing only wolf numbers has not had a measurable effect on moose numbers. Research conducted in nearby Unit 19D near McGrath indicated that control of both wolves and bears is necessary to achieve a more timely increase in the number of moose.

Because the Focus Area is a relatively small part of the unit, removing black bears and grizzly bears from within it will have only a minor effect on the black and grizzly bear populations in all of Unit 19A, and will not negatively impact the sustainability of either black or grizzly bear populations.

The Department considered many other management options besides predator control. Hunting and trapping seasons for bears and wolves were liberalized, but harvests didn’t increase enough to reduce predator populations. Public control of bears using public permits to snare bears was considered, but public snaring programs elsewhere in the state have not been successful. Live-capture and moving bears was also considered, but cost and a lack of publicly acceptable release sites are prohibitive.

 

 

DAVE’S TAKES LEAD, TANGLES OUT OF FISHING WEIGHTS

 

 

MAY 30, 2014  LEAVE A COMMENT

On a yearly basis new products arrive on the fishing scene. Rarely does one make a splash like Dave’s Tangle Free.

Lead has long been the standard for weight in terminal gear setups for Salmon & Steelhead. Drift fishermen, float fishermen, side-drifters, back-bouncers all utilize lead in their tackle boxes to accomplish one purpose – to get the bait/lure in front of the fishes face.

It’s really a simple concept – weight is used to target specific depths & water types.

So where does Dave’s Tangle Free fit in to this?

davesweights

Dave’s Tangle Free is a brand new alternative to lead. It has burst on to the scene with a few claims to fame. Here are three benefits:

1    Lead-Free : This alone sets Dave’s Tangle Free apart as a forward thinking, innovative company. States that have outlawed lead as a fishing weight will need high-quality alternatives to lead. Dave’s Tangle Free fills that need.

2    Tangle-resistant : The swivel system in place on these weights allows for “wiggle-room” and movement when caught up. Also, the rubberized outer layer (the core is steel) does not “grab” rocks like lead would. These two factors make for a weight that pulls out of snags more often than lead. We at Fishing Addicts Northwest have seen the benefit of this. Many times when a weight seemed a lost cause snagged-up, they pulled out without breaking the line or losing the weight. This is ultimately a money saver in the end and a relief to the fisherman.

3    Easy-to-Use : Besides the obvious benefits of being tangle resistant, the weights themselves come attached with a top “swivel” piece that is easily attachable to a snap-swivel or tie-able to any line. These weights have totally replaced my previous bobber weights as I prefer a three-way swivel with attachable weight when fishing a sliding float. Also, for those that would attach a “slinky” to a snap swivel, the Dave’s Tangle Free weight works great in place of that.

The feel of these weights on the bottom is different than “slinky’s” or traditional lead. This may be slightly off-putting at first for drift-fishermen but they will find quickly that the weights are super effective as well as stealthy. Back-bouncers have found huge benefit in the “tangle-resistant” qualities of these weights. The method of back-bouncing is prone to placing lead in precarious positions. With the rubberized outer core and versatile swivel, it’s simple: you will lose less weights.

Does this mean you’ll never lose a Dave’s Tangle Free weight? No, logs & certain other obstacles can still claim a weight or two, but every single person that I’ve spoken with has retained more Dave’s Tangle Free weights than any other lead option hands down. They simply come back easier. I’ve even started making my lead-line heavier so that I can apply more pressure to it and many times the weights have pulled out of difficult positions.

With that in mind we have seen a move in recent years to eliminate lead in many states. Certainly this comes as no surprise due to the “state of California” perspective on it and the simple fact that we’re filling our river-bottoms with lead. This alone may be one of the largest reasons for why Dave’s Tangle Free is a great option for your tackle-box. The Smallmouth bass guys in the Columbia river are already picking up on them too, not to mention numerous other fishing applications in our area.

Dave’s Tangle Free brings a fresh perspective to the weight world. No doubt the benefits of these weights will continue to be seen & shared in years to come.

davestanglefree

Ed Fast, a highly respected Portland-area Salmon & Steelhead guide had this to say about Dave’s weights:

“The slickest and trickiest weights you can buy! Dave gave me some back-bouncing weights to try and my clients and I loved them! I ordered a bunch more in all of the sizes I use and we only lost a few during my fall Chinook season. I also like them for my bobber rods.”

Ed mentioned to me how much lead he used to lose back-bouncing lead in upriver, bouldery situations, with the new lead he’s had considerably less lost weights and consequently; saved money on weight!

“When it’s available, I always try to use and promote local, quality, made in the U.S.A products. Dave’s weights meet all three of those criteria.

The fact that there is a functional, lead-free weight for some fishing situations is another thing I like about them.

And hey, they look really cool, too and let’s face it, that’s pretty important.”

For more, visit the website, http://www.davestanglefree.com/.

Not sure which weights to get? Check out the products page. The “Handi-Pack” retails at only $19.95 and features the perfect assortment of weights and sizes. We love these weights and we know you’ll find them to be an essential part of your tackle-box!

handipacks

Bi-Mart is now stocking Dave’s Tangle Free! Keep an eye out in the Fishing Department.

You can follow them on Facebook –https://www.facebook.com/DavesTangleFree

Stay Addicted! -Lucas

Editor’s note: This product review first appeared on the Fishing Addicts Northwest website under the the title Introducing Daves Tangle Free! and is used with permission of the author, Lucas Holmgren.

Bear Attack Survivor’s Harrowing Tale

Photo by Tom Reale

Photo by Tom Reale

 

 

A young Alaskan woman played dead during a frightening bear attack. 

From Yahoo news:

The bear knocked Gamboa down, then picked her up and threw her to the ground. The bear went on to pummel Gamboa several times more with her powerful paws.

Throughout the May 18 attack, Gamboa lay in a fetal position and remained silent.

That action likely saved her life.

“I actually can’t even believe this actually really happened,” the 25-year-old woman said in a videotaped interview released by the Army on Thursday. “It seems still surreal, just for the fact that I’m still alive — seems unreal. “

In the interview taped Tuesday at her hospital bed, Gamboa said she surrendered herself to the bear during the attack at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson in Anchorage after she encountered the animal and her two cubs. Gamboa, of Sacramento, California, is married to a soldier assigned at the base to the 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division.

A Closeup Look At Alaska Wildfire

A spruce grouse navigates through the charred remnants of the Funny River Fire on the Kenai Peninsula. (PHOTO BY GARTH BILDERBACK)

A spruce grouse navigates through the charred remnants of the Funny River Fire on the Kenai Peninsula. (PHOTO BY GARTH BILDERBACK)

 

The  Funny River fire has burned 156,000 acres of Kenai Peninsula land, prompting 600 firefighters into action to help slow down the blaze that, per the Anchorage Daily News, jumped the Kenai River over the holiday weekend. Our frequent contributors, Steve Meyer and Christine Cunningham, live in the area and have been assisting their friends coping with the dangers of a spreading wildfire. Steve was kind enough to send us an update:

The fire to this point has been as close to the “perfect storm” as one could hope for. For the past 15 years the central and northern sections of the Kenai Peninsula have been a tinderbox. That there would be a fire was of no question, it was only a matter of when. Originally the powers that be stated it was started from a campfire that was not properly doused but then stated perhaps not and, it was still under investigation.  The Kenai does occasionally have lightening, which has started fires in years gone by but there were no lightening incidents at the time this one started so it is almost assuredly caused by human interaction. For this fire to go on for eight days without injury and at this point, no verified structure damage is nothing short of astonishing. The fire-fighting effort by Central Emergency Services, State Division of Forestry, the Canadian water bomber plains, National Guard helicopters and all of the volunteer assistance from local residents has been remarkable.

Social media has been the most up to date source of information for people and Brad Nelson, the communications fella with Central Emergency Services has done an amazing job of tireless reporting on their site keeping people informed. Numerous posts enlisting help of one sort or another have been posted and instantly there is more help available than needed. Even people from the Palmer/Wasilla area have volunteered their support. Local businesses have donated rooms for people evacuated from homes, pet care has been provided. The fire crews have had some shortages of personal things like socks and toothpaste and people are instantly providing these items.  It has been a real heartwarming display of what can be done by people who care about their fellows.

At present, Monday evening (5 pm), the western flank (Kasilof area) seems to be secure. The northeastern flank is having some issues primarily due to a south wind that built up yesterday and blew cinders across the Kenai River. At the fire briefing this morning there were unconfirmed losses of several recreational cabins north of the Kenai River near the Killey River junction to the Kenai. On Monday the wind died down some, but it has picked back up again and this evening will likely produce expansion of the fire to the north.

People are concerned about wildlife loss in the fire. Most do not understand that even when moving rapidly a fire does not travel more than about ¾ mph. Wildlife easily remove themselves from the path, but of course there will be some loss of bird nests and any small animal young that are still in the nesting stages.

The eastern flank of the fire, which is towards the Kenai Mountains where there is no human habitation, has been largely ignored. It will burn out when it runs out of fuel on the mountain slopes.

The upside is the fire has not harmed anyone and frankly was long overdue. Wildlife in the area will benefit as they do in the aftermath of virtually all wildfires. New growth will sprout and the area will once again be the magnificent habitat it has been in years’ past. This fire could return the Kenai to the most prolific moose habitat in the world, as it once was.

The future is uncertain for the northern Kenai Peninsula. It too is a tinderbox waiting for a spark; depending on wind conditions when it happens, it could also spark a blaze, and the odds say it will be catastrophic. The current fire may promote some aggressive fire management from the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge, but that seems unlikely. They take a “natural diversity” stance and have been remiss in doing any real fire control work in the area. Rain is predicted for Tuesday afternoon and possibly Wednesday, but the peninsula is so dry at this point, it will take much more than a shower to have a significant effect on the current fire or the potential for future fire incidents. Alaska is unique in its ability to dry itself practically immediately after a good rain.

Here is the web address for CES, probably the most up-to-date and accurate information available on the fire: https://www.facebook.com/home.php#!/groups/219062911462753/

——————-

Much thanks to Steve and Christine, and here’s hoping everyone stays safe.

 

 

Memorial Day Remembrances

I’m sure I’ve said it before during one of my blog posts, but I’m a history geek. I almost jumped out of my chair last night when I was channel surfing and saw the History Channel’s promo for its three-part event, The World Wars.  My Dad is 82 now, a Navy veteran of the Korean War, and I’ve been trying to convince him to get on a plane and check out Normandy and other war sites in France. But while Memorial Day is all about the coming off summer, baseball game and cookouts, it’s also one of those holidays where you have to take time out to reflect on those brave soldiers who have been lost, from Bunker Hill to Afghanistan, it’s important to reflect a little while you’re enjoying the holiday weekend.

I grew up in San Bruno, just south of San Francisco, and moved back there for a few years before relocating again to take on the editor’s position with California Sportsman’s parent company, Media Inc. publishing. The Golden Gate National Cemetery is located right alongside the street where I’d walk my dog every day, and each day we’d slow down a bit and I’d peek over the tombstones of those who fell in various conflicts. I know what these men and women have sacrificed for us. So I just wanted to post some of pictures of stops I’ve made over the years, and I just hope you all take a moment to say thanks on this holiday.

Shiloh National Battlefield
Shiloh (Tenn.) National Battlefield

 

54th Massachusetts mural, Smithsonian National Gallery
54th Massachusetts mural, Smithsonian National Gallery

World War II Memorial, Washington D.C.

World War II Memorial, Washington D.C.

Arlington National Cemetery; Washington D.C.
Arlington National Cemetery; Washington D.C.

 

 

Gettysburg
Gettysburg
Philadelphia
Philadelphia
More Shiloh: The Peach Orchard
More Shiloh: The Peach Orchard
Little Round Top, Gettysburg
Little Round Top, Gettysburg

 

Salmon Landing At SeaTac

Photo courtesy of Alaska Airlines

Photo courtesy of Alaska Airlines

An Alaska Airlines flight that landed at Seattle-Tacoma International Airport had quite a distinguished passenger list: the first haul of Copper River king salmon.

As part of an annual event sponsored by Alaska Air Cargo, the plane was full of Copper salmon ready to be distributed to area restaurants, grocery stores, etc. was delivered at SeaTac.

From Market Watch:

At least five more Alaska Airlines flights today will transport salmon from Cordova, Alaska, to Anchorage, Seattle and throughout the United States. The flights will have fresh fish from three Alaska seafood processors: Copper River Seafoods, Ocean Beauty Seafoods and Trident Seafoods.

Alaska Airlines plays a significant role in supporting the Alaska seafood industry, which is recognized worldwide for its sustainable fishing practices. Last year, the carrier flew more than 24.5 million pounds of fresh Alaska seafood to the Lower 48 states and beyond, including 1 million pounds of Copper River salmon.

“No other airline delivers more Copper River salmon to the Lower 48 than Alaska Airlines, and making that happen within 24 hours after the fish is pulled from the water is no small feat,” said Betsy Bacon, managing director of Alaska Air Cargo. “Hundreds of employees from across the state of Alaska, Seattle and beyond spend months getting ready for the busy summer fish season.”

The annual tradition is part of the Copper Chef Cook-Off that involves local restaurants showing off their best salmon dishes.

A Beginner’s Guide To Gold Panning

Note: This story appears is in the May issue of Alaska Sporting Journal

PHOTO BY STEVE HERSCHBACH

PHOTO BY STEVE HERSCHBACH

By Steve Herschbach

Strike it rich! Many people would like to find a little gold. To find gold, a beginner needs nothing more than a gold pan and some basic tools.

The best way to learn how to pan for gold is to first get the right kind of gold pan. The steel gold pans of old are still made, but most actual miners and prospectors these days use plastic gold pans. The colored plastic pans show the gold better than the shiny surface of a steel pan, and plastic pans can be molded with “cheater riffles” that make it easier to pan and still not lose the gold.

In general green is considered one of the best colors for a gold pan, as it contrasts well both with the gold and the sand from which the gold is being liberated. A 14-inch gold pan is about the right size for most adults, while most children would probably be better served with a 10-inch pan.

In good hands, the pan is one of the most efficient devices available for gold recovery. There is some skill involved in gold panning, however, and the big mistake most people make is in not learning how to pan before going out for the first time.

Find a tub large enough to move the pan around inside the tub. Obtain a few flakes of gold, or lacking gold, and use a small flattened lead shot. The gold or lead flakes should be about 1/16 of an inch in diameter or smaller. Fill the tub with water, and fill the pan level to about 1 inch short of the top with sand, gravel, and small rocks. Some actual stream gravels are best. Carefully count out a number of lead or gold pieces and push them into the material in the pan. This is the key thing about this process. It is necessary to start with a known number of pieces in order to gauge how well the panning process is going. Ten flakes is a good number to use.

 

PHOTO BY STEVE HERSCHBACH

PHOTO BY STEVE HERSCHBACH

THERE ARE LOTS of ways to pan, but all that is important is getting rid of that sand and gravel while keeping those sample pieces. Submerge the pan just below the surface of the water, and allow the water to soak into the material. It may be necessary to stir the material up somewhat to wet all the material in to pan. Pick out any larger rocks at this time. Then shake the pan vigorously side to side and front to rear, all the while keeping it just under the water and basically level.

The goal is to get all the material in the pan moving vigorously and very soupy. The gold or lead is much heavier than an equal size piece of sand, and so with all the material moving around the test samples will quickly sink to the bottom of the pan.

The next step involves taking the pan of material and tilting it forward, away from the panner, and scooping some water up out of the tub. The goal is to try and make a wave similar to that seen on a beach. Scoop the pan into the water and then lift the pan while tossing the water away. The water should ride up the tilted pan, and then as the water flows back out of the pan it will carry some material out with it.

The secret is in keeping the material in the bottom of the pan stationary and letting the water wash off the top layer in the pan. Do not dump the material out of the pan; wash it out of the pan. Three or four of these “scoop and toss” washing actions take place. Then the pan goes back to the level/submerged position for another round of vigorous shaking. Then back up, tilt forward, and scoop/wash the material. Repeat this action until only a few spoonfuls of material remain in the pan. You can be vigorous at first, but get more careful the less material remaining in the pan. Watch the material carefully while washing for a glint of gold or lead. If a piece is seen, stop and shake it back down into the bottom of the pan. If the pieces are seen often, it means the shaking action has not been vigorous enough to sink the samples to the bottom of the pan.

More care must be used when washing as the last bit of material remains in the pan. One wrong move and everything in the pan will go in the tub! When only a spoonful of material remains, swirling the material around in the bottom of the pan with a small amount of water will reveal the pieces of gold (or lead).

A very handy tool at this point is the snuffer bottle, which is a plastic squeeze container with a tube inserted into in such a fashion that small items can be sucked into the bottle but can’t escape. This makes it easy to spot the flakes, and then suck them up while getting as little sand as possible. When all the pieces have been captured, dump material still in the pan into the tub. Then take the cap off the snuffer bottle and dump out the captured pieces back into the pan. It should now be very easy to separate the test samples from the tiny amount of sand remaining.

Now count them! All the original test pieces should be captured. If not, rinse everything out of the tub back into the pan and start all over. The first goal is to get to where all the test pieces are reliably recovered every time. When that point is reached, the next goal is to try and pan faster, to speed up the process. Beginning panners take incredible amounts of time on a single pan when they are learning, sometimes 15 to 20 minutes or more. But with practice it should take no more than a few minutes to work a pan of material. Gold panning championships are measured in seconds, not minutes.

If this kind of practice does not take place before going out to do some actual gold panning, the chances for any kind of success are very minimal. The new prospector will have no idea if there wasgold in the material they have chosen to pan. When nothing is found, they will be unsure if it is because of poor panning technique or just because there was no gold to start with. It is very important to have confidence so that when a particular spot is sampled with a pan a few times and nothing is found, the decision can be made to try panning somewhere else.

Other items handy for gold panning are rubber gloves for protection from cold water, rubber boots, a small shovel or large scoop, a small pry bar and, of course, a snuffer bottle. Be sure to have a bottle to put the gold in. Do not use glass, as it can be too easily dropped and broken. An optional item that can be a real aid is a half-inch screen. Screen the material into the pan while underwater, carefully washing, and then discarding the larger rocks. This speeds things considerably and makes panning easier. Dump the rocks next to you where you can spread them and look for a large nugget that did not go through the screen. Large nuggets are rare, but it could happen!

 

NEXT IS THE question of where to go gold panning. Always attempt to go where gold has already been found, as stumbling on an unknown gold deposit is not likely to happen. Be sure that the area is open to the public, or that permission is obtained from whoever has jurisdiction over the property. For most visitors with limited time, it will be best to stick with known public sites. These can be easily found on the internet.

When panning, it usually will make more sense to spend extra time and effort filling the pan with quality material. For example, splitting bedrock crevices and cleaning them thoroughly can take some time, but the material produced will usually have a better chance of producing a good showing of gold than simply filling the pan with a couple shovels full of bank material. Panning can produce substantial amounts of gold, but the material must be chosen carefully for good results. Good luck, and good panning!

Editor’s note: Steve Herschbach operates the gold website detectorprospector.com. Email him at contact@detectorprospector.com.