All posts by Chris Cocoles

Bering Sea Gold’s Emily Riedel ‘Digs’ Dredging

Emily Riedel aspires to be an opera singer and is studying in Europe.

Emily Riedel aspires to be an opera singer and is studying in Europe. (TIM BEERS JR./THE DISCOVERY CHANNEL)

By Chris Cocoles

I really enjoyed my conversation with Emily Riedel, one of the stars of the Discovery Channel’s reality series about Alaska gold dredging in Nome, Bering Sea Gold. One of my friends who’s a regular watcher of the show bemoaned Emily as one of the show’s emotionally melodramatic villains. But I found her friendly, honest, engaging and forthcoming during our chat, which is running in the February Alaska Sporting Journal.

Here’s a sneak preview:

Riedel, 25, is one of the star’s of the hit show. She’s not only the female in her group that doesn’t consider being called gold diggers a putdown. Riedel is also now captaining her own dredge, the EROICA, a name that befits her diverse lifestyle that includes an aspiring career as an opera singer (she’s really good; check out a performance on YouTube).
“It’s the name of Beethoven’s Third Symphony that he dedicated to Napoleon,” Riedel tells her new crew on a recent episode. Imagine any male skippers citing Austrian composer  Ludwig Van Beethoven himself as the inspiration for naming their boat! But this is reality TV, so there’s always drama, subplots and backstories getting in the way. Riedel took a stormy ride on her relationship roller coaster with Ezekiel “Zeke” Tenhoff, her childhood friend from Homer and fellow gold dredger (their romance and partnership working on the same dredge went kaput and seems unrepairable).
But Riedel has moved on to pilot the EROICA (bought with her own money) as the show’s third season sails on. Her dad-turned-dredger, Steve, is around, and Emily seems more determined than ever to strike it big in her home state as she puts singing on hold. 
“How I’d always approach Nome is I’d always think I’d have this bulging mountain to climb. But you have to change your attitude,” Riedel says. “You can’t change anything else. Because it’s going to be hard on your mind and your body. I know I’m able to scream and cry and get very angry at times, and lose hope at times.
“But I know I’ve been through worse. I’ll go through worse again. And I can navigate this. You just try and make strides toward success.”

(TIM BEERS JR/THE DISCOVERY CHANNEL)

(TIM BEERS JR/THE DISCOVERY CHANNEL)

 

Zero Tolerance Rolls Out A Host Of Knives, Tomahawk For 2014

By Andy Walgamott, on January 23rd, 2014

Zero Tolerance Introduces the 0102 Tomahawk

Vanadis 4 Extra powdered steel makes it tough and durable

TUALATIN, OREGON— Zero Tolerance is proud to introduce our own tactical tomahawk, the new 0102.

This powerful tool is adept at everything from obstacle removal and dynamic entry to opening crates. Like everything else we do, the Tomahawk is overbuilt for extreme use. The back spike is designed for maximum penetration, while the pommel includes a sturdy pry bar.

Vanadis 4 Extra powdered steel makes the ZT tomahawk extremely tough, while the DLC coating protects the blade. G-10 handle scales offer a secure grip and are beveled for comfort.

The Tomahawk comes with its own sheath for storage and easy carrying.

0102_tilt_render

Model 0562 specifications:

• MADE IN THE USA

• INCLUDES SHEATH

Steel: Vadadis 4 Extra, tungsten DLC coating
Handle: Machined G-10 scales
Blade: 4.75 in. long & 0.2 in. thick
Overall: 16 in.
MSRP: $400

 

A New Fixed Blade from ZT & Rick Hinderer

• Based on Hinderer’s Fieldtac knife

TUALATIN, OREGON—Based on Rick Hinderer’s Fieldtac knife, the new Zero Tolerance 0180 is a smaller and lighter fixed blade knife, yet it’s built to handle tough duty.

The blade is made of Vanadis 4 Extra powder mettalurgical cold work steel. This steel is perfectly designed for hard use and offers good wear resistance. Resistance to chipping and cracking makes it an excellent steel for hard-use applications like the 0180. It is also very suitable for coating—which ZT does with Tungsten DLC non-reflective coating.

The 0180’s handle scales are G-10 for durability as well as reduced weight. The handle locks right into the hand and the forefinger contour provides grip security. Heavy jimping on the spine further enhances grip.

The 0180 comes with a convenient belt sheath.

0180_Hinderer  FieldTac_render

Model 0562 specifications:

• MADE IN THE USA
• FIXED BLADE
• FULL TANG
• CHAIN-RING HARDWARE
• INCLUDES BELT SHEATH

Steel: Vadadis 4 Extra, tungsten DLC coating
Handle: Machined G-10, dual chamfers
Blade: 4.2 in. long & 0.2 in. thick
Overall: 9.2 in.
MSRP: $275

 

New Zero Tolerance Blackwash™ Finish is the New Black

• Zero Tolerance is one of the first major manufacturers to use this new type of finish on production knives

TUALATIN, OREGON—Zero Tolerance introduces BlackWash.

A BlackWash knife is like a battle-tested tool or a favorite pair of well-worn jeans. BlackWash gives a ZT that already-broken-in look. Although a few custom knife makers have been using this process, Zero Tolerance is one of the first major manufacturers to use it on production knives. Like any coating, it will wear eventually, but with BlackWash, additional wear just adds to the look.

ZT0560BW_Front-HiRes

0560BW specifications:

? MADE IN THE USA
? ASSISTED OPENING
? QUAD-MOUNT 4-POSITION CLIP
? TITANIUM FRAME LOCK, LOCKBAR STABILIZER

Steel: ELMAX®, Tungsten DLC BlackWash™ finish
Handle: 3D machined G10- front; 3D-machined titanium back, BlackWash™ finish
Blade: 3.75 in. (9.5 cm)
Closed: 5 in. (12.7 in.)
Weight: 5.8 oz.
MSRP: $325

0300BW specifications:

? MADE IN THE USA
? KVT BALL-BEARING OPENING SYSTEM
? QUAD-MOUNT 4-POSITION CLIP
? DEEP-CARRY CLIP
? TITANIUM FRAME LOCK, LOCKBAR STABILIZER

Steel: S30V, Tungsten DLC BlackWash™ finish
Handle: 3D machined G10- front; 3D-machined titanium back, BlackWash™ finish
Blade: 3.75 in. (9.5 cm)
Closed: 5.1 in. (12.9 in.)
Weight: 5.8 oz.
MSRP: $340

 

ELMAX® Blade, Hinderer & ZT Style and Toughness

• The new 0562 features a special Hinderer “slicer” grind

TUALATIN, OREGON—For 2014, Zero Tolerance and Rick Hinderer teamed up to build the new 0562.

The ELMAX® powdered steel blade features a special Hinderer, a flat-ground “slicer” grind that provides both slicing efficiency and a tough point. ELMAX is a third-generation powdered steel with virtually no nonmetallic inclusions. This means it offers an extremely uniform distribution of carbides for high wear and corrosion resistance. Zero Tolerance sharpens it to a hair popping edge and the ELMAX ensures it holds that edge for a long time, even under hard use.

The knife opens with a flipper and moves out of the handle on our smooth KVT ball-bearing opening system. A washer with caged ball bearings surrounds the pivot and makes opening the knife nearly frictionless; just pull back on the flipper and add a roll of the wrist and the 0562 is ready for action.

The handle has a G-10 textured scale in front and a stonewashed titanium back. For secure lock up during use, ZT uses a frame lock with hardened steel lockbar inserts and lockbar stabilization.

The unique pocketclip is reversible and enables extra-deep carry in the pocket.

0562 0562_back_closed_render

Model 0562 specifications:

• MADE IN THE USA
• KVT BALL-BEARING OPENING SYSTEM
• SPECIAL HINDERER “SLICER” BLADE GRIND
• REVERSIBLE (LEFT/RIGHT)
• DEEP-CARRY CLIP
• FRAME LOCK, LOCKBAR STABILIZER

Steel: ELMAX®, stonewashed finish
Handle: G-10 front, stonewashed titanium back
Blade: 3.5 in. long & 0.156 in. thick
Closed: 4.8 in
MSRP: $250

M390 + Carbon Fiber in our Newest Right-Sized ZT

• A carbon fiber front scale lightens weight and adds class

TUALATIN, OREGON— The cousin of our new 0562, this ZT features the same special Rick Hinderer flat-ground “slicer” grind that provides both slicing efficiency and a tough point, but on a Böhler M390 powdered steel blade.

With a high chromium and vanadium content, M390 offers good wear resistance with excellent corrosion resistance. This powdered metallurgy stainless steel takes a razor edge and holds it well. It can also be polished to a mirror finish and is very tough.

The 0562CF’s handle has a carbon fiber front scale and stonewashed titanium back. For secure lock up during use, ZT uses a frame lock with hardened steel lockbar inserts and lockbar stabilization.

The knife opens with a flipper and moves out of the handle on our smooth KVT ball-bearing opening system. A washer with caged ball bearings surrounds the pivot and makes opening the knife nearly frictionless; just pull back on the flipper and add a roll of the wrist and the 0562CF is ready for action.

The unique pocketclip is reversible and enables extra-deep carry in the pocket.

0562CF 0562CF_back_closed_render

Model 0562CF specifications:

• MADE IN THE USA
• KVT BALL-BEARING OPENING SYSTEM
• SPECIAL HINDERER “SLICER” BLADE GRIND
• REVERSIBLE (LEFT/RIGHT)
• DEEP-CARRY CLIP
• FRAME LOCK, LOCKBAR STABILIZER

Steel: M390, stonewashed & machine satin finish
Handle: Carbon fiber front, stonewashed titanium back
Blade: 3.5 in. long & 0.156 in. thick
Closed: 4.8 in
MSRP: $300

The Zero Tolerance 0770CF Now Comes with Carbon Fiber Handle

• A compact version of the award-winning Zero Tolerance 0777

* New carbon fiber handle for lightweight carry

TUALATIN, OREGON—The original, award-winning Zero Tolerance 0777 is a very limited-run knife. Yet interest in it is high among blade aficionados.

That’s why Zero Tolerance is proud to announce a new version of that award-winning knife—one that will be much more generally available. The 0770CF offers the style and performance of the award-winning 0777, but in a slightly smaller, streamlined version.

For ZT performance, the blade is built of ELMAX® powdered steel, which provides the ability to take a razor edge, excellent edge retention, strength, and toughness. A stonewashed finish on the blade hides hard-use scratches and makes maintenance easier.

The sweeping lines of the original 0777 are preserved in the lightweight carbon fiber handle that nestles securely in the hand. An inset liner lock secures the blade.

The 0770CF opens quickly and easily thanks to SpeedSafe® assisted opening and the built-in flipper. A deep-carry pocketclip ensures it rides securely in the pocket. For a final touch of class, ZT adds a handsome oversized pivot.

0770CF_profile

0770CF specifications:

• MADE IN THE USA
• ASSISTED OPENING
• REVERSIBLE (TIP-UP/DOWN)
• DEEP-CARRY CLIP
• INSET LINER LOCK

Steel: ELMAX®
Handle: Carbon fiber
Blade: 3.25 in. (8.3 cm)
Closed: 4.3 in. (10.9 in.)
Weight: 3 oz.
MSRP: $225

 

Zero Tolerance & Emerson Team Up on Two New Knives

• Both will feature the Emerson’s patented “wave shaped feature” opening

TUALATIN, OREGON— Zero Tolerance and Emerson Knives put their hard-use heads together to create two new ZT knives: the 0620 and the 0620CF.

Both feature premium blade steel. Both feature the famous Emerson “wave shaped opening feature.” Both honor their commitment to innovative technology, award-winning design, and top-quality craftsmanship.

The patented Emerson “wave shaped feature” enables each of these new knives to be opened as it is removed from the pocket. By the time the knife has been fully withdrawn from the pocket, the blade is deployed and ready for use. A small wave-shaped tab on the top of the blade is built to catch on the pocket seam, opening the knife as it comes out of the pocket. This Emerson instant-open feature is a favorite among military, rescue, and law enforcement knife users.

Both knives feature a modified tanto style blade that locks securely into place with a sturdy frame lock. Hardened steel inserts in the lockbar make it extra durable. The 0620’s blade is ELMAX® steel with DLC blade coating, while the 0620CF’s is M390 steel with a stonewashed and satin finish.

0620CF Open Back 0620CF_tilt_render

0620CF specifications:

• MADE IN THE USA
• WAVE SHAPED OPENING FEATURE
• THUMB DISK FOR MANUAL OPENING
• REVERSIBLE CLIP (LEFT/RIGHT)
• FRAME LOCK, HARDENED-STEEL LOCKBAR INSERTS

Steel: ELMAX®, DLC coating
Handle: G-10 front, bead-blasted titanium back
Blade: 3.6 in.
Closed: 4.9 in
MSRP: $250

0620 specifications

0620 Open Tilt 0620 Open Back

• MADE IN THE USA
• WAVE SHAPED OPENING FEATURE
• THUMB DISK FOR MANUAL OPENING
• REVERSIBLE CLIP (LEFT/RIGHT)
• FRAME LOCK, HARDENED-STEEL LOCKBAR INSERTS

Steel: M390, stonewashed & satin finish
Handle: G-10 front, bead-blasted titanium back
Blade: 3.6 in.
Closed: 4.9 in.
MSRP: $300

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Local Fishermen, Washington senator apply anti-Pebble Mine pressure

Sen. Maria Cantwell (in green), joins local fisherman and community members at Thursday's Stop Pebble Beach Rally in Seattle.

Sen. Maria Cantwell (in green), joins local fishermen and community members at Thursday’s Stop Pebble Mine rally.

By Chris Cocoles

SEATTLE – Chilly temperatures greeted a hearty group of an estimated 150 fishermen and community members attending Thursday’s Stop Pebble Mine rally at the Fisherman’s Terminal in Seattle’s Ballard neighborhood.

Among several speakers who took the podium was Washington Sen. Maria Cantwell (D), who has penned a letter headed to President Obama in Washington pleading to kill the proposed mining operation that could affect Bristol Bay’s rich salmon fishery and the 14,000 jobs it supports.

“We’re certainly sending a letter today, and we’re emphasizing the regional economic importance of the salmon industry to Washington State and to the larger region, and asking (the president) to take action to protect it,” said Cantwell, who was then asked if she was frustrated with the lack of a public statement from the president on this matter.

“Well, this (Environmental Protection Agency) report just came out last week, and obviously there’s a lot going on. We certainly want to sharpen the focus of the administration that this is an important economic issue, and a vital one for everyone.”

You can read Cantwell’s full letter to Obama here, but she wrote in part:

“I write you today to urge your Administration to use its authority to safeguard the headwaters of Bristol Bay, Alaska, and keep them protected from devastating mining pollutants. Washington state’s maritime economy is worth more than $30 billion in economic activity annually, supporting 148,000 jobs. Recent scientific evidence shows that pollutants from the proposed development of large scale mining near Bristol Bay would irreversibly harm this vital salmon habitat and put in danger Washington’s entire maritime economy.”

“I think the important thing is we forced the science to be done,” Cantwell said after the rally. “A lot of people I think were thinking, ‘Let’s wait until a later point in time.’ But this industry, here in Ballard, said to me this is too important an issue to wait and see what happens when it’s millions of dollars through the process. It’s going to cause a problem; let’s realize that right now. And I think that scientific study that was done really helped crystallize that.”

On her reaction to last week’s lengthy EPA findings, Cantwell said: “I was kind of shocked that a (mining) proposal like this would be proposed given the economic impact and the dangers of that material to something as critical as a vital watershed for salmon. When you look at the information, you are shocked that anyone would propose such a thing. I think the science was a very long process and thought out. And that’s what’s important about science is to do that homework. It’s pretty indicting of the notion that anybody should propose something on that scale on that headwater.”

Local chef and restaurateur Tom Douglas is spearheading a campaign of more than 250 chefs who also plan to put the full-court press on the Obama administration to block the proposal led by mining company Northern Dynasty Minerals Ltd.

“We have 800 co-workers who use salmon as their living, and we are so proud of that,” Douglas said.

One of the most impassioned speeches Thursday came from Alannah Hurley of the United Tribes of Bristol Bay; she is a Yup’ik Eskimo who is a subsistence fisherman and a commercial set netter.

“The EPA watershed assessment said it loud and clear: If our salmon are harmed in Bristol Bay, it will devastate the nutritional, the social and the spiritual health of our people. I don’t have to think about that very hard because they are referring to me. They are referring to my neighbors,” she said.

“The pro-mine folks say mining and salmon can coexist. All of us here today know that is not possible. The science of the assessment proves that this type development of within our watershed will devastate it. And therefore, it will devastate people like you and me who rely on it.”

Local fisherman Brett Veerhusen spoke for his colleagues who attended the rally, He is one of thousands of Pacific Northwest commercial fisherman and sport anglers who work Bristol Bay’s waters

“I think what’s really brought this attention, is the Bristol Bay fishery provides 14,000 jobs nationwide. And what we’ve been able to do is rally fisherman across the country and get them to understand how important it is to protect our natural resources. And we’ve been able to put a lot of pressure by educating and doing outreach with other fishermen nationwide,” Veerhusen said

“We’re not against mining. This is just the wrong mine in the wrong place. We don’t need the gold that bad.”

Photos By Chris Cocoles 
IMG_2257     IMG_2292IMG_2263 IMG_2261
IMG_2321IMG_2299

Moose Season Extended in Barrow

If you have desire to hunt moose in the extreme northern part of Alaska, you’ll have more chances to do so. The Alaska Board of Game agreed to extend the moose hunting season by 16 days and will affect the areas around Nome, Bethel, Barrow and Kotzebue.

From the Bristol Bay Times:

The season has been extended by 16 days and now runs from Aug. 1 to Sept. 30. Hunters in the region have long been requesting the extension to the end of September to allow for cooler temperatures, which offer better conditions to take care of the meat. The moose harvest is relatively low — just nine moose taken in the area in 2012 and five the year before. And while the population of moose in Unit 26A declined significantly between 2008 and 2011, the moose population within the trend-count area has increased as of late. In the 2012, the bull-cow ratio was 68 -100, “suggesting that small increases in the harvest of bulls are unlikely to interfere with population growth,” read a comment report from ADF&G.

Board of Game member Bob Mumford was one of two members who did not support the proposal.

“At this point we should err on the side of caution,” he said at the meeting on Monday.

But other members were confident with department’s promise to watch the population closely and adjust accordingly.

“… the department has made me feel comfortable that they feel comfortable,” said member Nate Turner.

Board of Game chairman Ted Spaker added that there is reason to be cautious, but he thinks bulking up the season by two weeks will not affect the population adversely.

 

 

Winter Fun With Tanalian Aviation

Tanalian Aviation, located in Port Alsworth, is offering plenty of special rates for the upcoming snow events in Alaska.

February 15th & 16th – The Iron Dog snow machine race:

 

March 1st & 2nd – The Iditarod:

  • View the Race Start on the 1st in Anchorage*
  • View the Race Re-Start on the 2nd at Willow Lake*
  • Contact us for details

For more information, go to tanalianaviation.net, or call 907-781-2217.

EPA’s Final Assessment Finds Plenty Of Risks In Bristol Bay Mine

EPA’s Final Assessment Finds Plenty Of Risks In Bristol Bay Mine

By Andy Walgamott, on January 15th, 2014

(U.S ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY PRESS RELEASE)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today released its final Bristol Bay Assessment describing potential impacts to salmon and ecological resources from proposed large-scale copper and gold mining in Bristol Bay, Alaska. The report, titled “An Assessment of Potential Mining Impacts on Salmon Ecosystems of Bristol Bay, Alaska,” concludes that large-scale mining in the Bristol Bay watershed poses risks to salmon and Alaska Native cultures. Bristol Bay supports the largest sockeye salmon fishery in the world, producing nearly 50 percent of the world’s wild sockeye salmon with runs averaging 37.5 million fish each year.

AN EPA GRAPH SHOWS THAT 50 PERCENT OF THE WORLD'S SOCKEYE COME FROM BRISTOL BAY. (EPA)

AN EPA GRAPH SHOWS THAT 50 PERCENT OF THE WORLD’S SOCKEYE COME FROM BRISTOL BAY. (EPA)

“Over three years, EPA compiled the best, most current science on the Bristol Bay watershed to understand how large-scale mining could impact salmon and water in this unique area of unparalleled natural resources,” said Dennis McLerran, Regional Administrator for EPA Region 10. “Our report concludes that large-scale mining poses risks to salmon and the tribal communities that have depended on them for thousands of years. The assessment is a technical resource for governments, tribes and the public as we consider how to address the challenges of large-scale mining and ecological protection in the Bristol Bay watershed.”

(EPA)

(EPA)

To assess potential mining impacts to salmon resources, EPA considered realistic mine scenarios based on a preliminary plan that was published by Northern Dynasty Minerals Ltd. and submitted to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. EPA also considered mining industry references and consulted mining experts. Numerous risks associated with large-scale mining are detailed in the assessment:

Risks from Routine Operation

Mine Footprint: Depending on the size of the mine, EPA estimates 24 to 94 miles of salmon-supporting streams and 1,300 to 5,350 acres of wetlands, ponds, and lakes would be destroyed. EPA estimates an additional 9 to 33 miles of salmon-supporting streams would experience altered streamflows likely to affect ecosystem structure and function.

Waste and Wastewater Management: Extensive quantities of mine waste, leachates, and wastewater would have to be collected, stored, treated and managed during mining and long after mining concludes. Consistent with the recent record of similar mines operating in the United States, polluted water from the mine site could enter streams through uncollected leachate or runoff, in spite of modern mining practices. Under routine operations, EPA estimates adverse direct and indirect effects on fish in 13 to 51 miles of streams.

AN ARTICLE IN NORTHWEST SPORTSMAN'S SISTER MAGAZINE, ALASKA SPORTING JOURNAL, FOUND THAT IT EVEN IF NOTHING BIG GOES WRONG, LITTLE FAILURES CAN ADD UP TO BIG PROBLEMS.

AN ARTICLE IN ALASKA SPORTING JOURNAL LAST YEAR FOUND THAT IT EVEN IF NOTHING BIG GOES WRONG, LITTLE FAILURES CAN ADD UP TO BIG PROBLEMS.

Risks from Accidents and Failures

Wastewater Treatment Plant: Short and long-term water collection and treatment failures are possible. Depending on the size of the mine, EPA estimates adverse direct and indirect effects on fish in 48 to 62 miles of streams under a wastewater treatment failure scenario.

Transportation Corridor: A transportation corridor to Cook Inlet would cross wetlands and approximately 64 streams and rivers in the Kvichak River watershed, 55 of which are known or likely to support salmon. Culvert failures, runoff, and spills of chemicals would put salmon spawning areas in and near Iliamna Lake at risk.

Pipeline: Consistent with the recent record of petroleum pipelines and of similar mines operating in North and South America, pipeline failures along the transportation corridor could release toxic copper concentrate or diesel fuel into salmon-supporting streams or wetlands.

Tailings Dam: Failure of a tailings storage facility dam that released only a partial volume of the stored tailings would result in catastrophic effects on fishery resources.

The assessment found that the Bristol Bay ecosystem generated $480 million in economic activity in 2009 and provided employment for over 14,000 full and part-time workers. The region supports all five species of Pacific salmon found in North America: sockeye, coho, Chinook, chum and pink. In addition, it is home to more than 20 other fish species, 190 bird species, and more than 40 terrestrial mammal species, including bears, moose and caribou.

In 2010, several Bristol Bay Alaska Native tribes requested that EPA take action under the Clean Water Act to protect the Bristol Bay watershed and salmon resources from development of the proposed Pebble Mine, a copper, gold and molybdenum mining venture backed by Northern Dynasty Minerals Ltd. Other tribes asked EPA to wait for a mine permitting process to begin before taking action on the potential environmental issues Pebble Mine presents.

Before responding to these requests, EPA identified a need for a scientific assessment to better inform the agency and others. EPA and other scientists with expertise in Alaska fisheries, mining, geochemistry, anthropology, risk assessment, and other disciplines reviewed information compiled by federal resource agencies, tribes, the mining industry, the State of Alaska, and scientific institutions from around the world. EPA focused on the Nushagak and Kvichak River watersheds, which support approximately half of the Bristol Bay sockeye salmon runs.

EPA maintained an open public process, reviewing and considering all comments and scientific data submitted during two separate public comment periods. The agency received approximately 233,000 comments on the first draft of the assessment and 890,000 comments on the second draft. EPA held eight public meetings attended by approximately 2,000 people. EPA consulted with federally recognized tribal governments and Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act village and regional corporations.

The study has been independently peer reviewed for its scientific quality by 12 scientists with expertise in mine engineering, salmon fisheries biology, aquatic ecology, aquatic toxicology, hydrology, wildlife ecology, and Alaska Native cultures.

The agency reviewed information about the copper deposit at the Pebble site and used data submitted by Northern Dynasty Minerals Ltd. to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, including the document titled “Preliminary Assessment of the Pebble Project, Southwest, Alaska,” which provides detailed descriptions of three mine development cases representing 25, 45 and 78 years of open pit mining. The 45-year development scenario was presented as the reference case in the Northern Dynasty report.

Over the course of the assessment, EPA met with tribes, Alaska Native corporations, mining company representatives, state and local governments, tribal councils, fishing industry representatives, jewelry companies, seafood processors, restaurant owners, chefs, conservation organizations, members of the faith community, and members of Congress.

EPA produced the report with its authority to perform scientific assessments under Clean Water Act section 104. As a scientific report, this study does not recommend policy or regulatory decisions.

For more information on the EPA Bristol Bay Assessment, visit http://www.epa.gov/bristolbay.

 

Pat’s Backcountry Beverages Lets You Pack Beer Anywhere Your Feet Can Take You

 

Tired of not having beer during sporting adventures because of its weight?

Well, Pat’s Backcountry Beverages has the answer for you!

PatsBackcountryBev

They’ve created the world’s first craft beer concentrate along with a portable beverage carbonator that’s sure to make you the most popular guy or gal at camp! Bring beer ANYWHERE!

Available at www.patsbcb.com

Husky Liners Protect Your Car From Messy Alaska

HuskyLiners

How is that we have more SUV’s and fewer dirt roads than ever before?
That’s a lot of plow horses being driven like show ponies. But if you’re
one of the seemingly fewer and fewer people who still uses your vehicle to
its full potential, you’ll appreciate what Husky Liners Vehicle Armor does
for your car, truck or SUV.

With Husky Liners, you can do what you do without having to fret over the potentially messy consequences.                                                                                                            Our engineers use state-of-the-art laser measuring technologies to ensure an
exact fit. From the Classic Style , to the WeatherBeater , to the X-act
Contour  all our floor and cargo liners are made of tough, durable
elastomeric materials with ‘nibs’ on the underside to prevent sliding or
shifting.

Every one of our Husky Liners Vehicle Armor products is made
right here in America and are unconditionally guaranteed for life. So
visit huskyliners.com for customer reviews and to find the floor liner
that best suits your vehicle.  And then get out there and do what you do.

 

 

Coeur d’Alene Dressing Company’s Sausage-Spiced Flavor

 

CouerDAlene

Making your own sausage couldn’t be easier using Coeur d’Alene Dressing Company’s  three sausage
seasoning blends: Hot Italian, Sweet Italian and Sage Breakfast. Just
add to a little water and mix into any ground meat, domestic or game,
grinding your own or have your local butcher grind something for you.
Use our seasoning blends for sausage patties, stuffing links or as a
great rub. Our products are made with no MSG, nitrates, fillers or
anti-caking ingredients.

Made with a dozen fine spices you can wake up
your taste buds with our Sage Breakfast Sausage blend. Our Sweet
Italian blend gives you a little sweet, a little warm…great for any
Italian dish, with cracked fennel, garlic and a few crushed chilis.
Try the Hot Italian blend if you want a robust, bold sausage that
leaves your lips “humming”.

Dedicated to providing great customer
service, we pride ourselves on making exceptional products at
reasonable prices. Check our other award-winning dressings, BBQ sauc
es, rubs and marinades at http://www.cdadressing.com. Call
800-687-1462 for free samples.