All posts by Chris Cocoles

2020 Dates Available To Fish With Angler’s Alibi

The following is courtesy of Angler’s Alibi:

2019 in Review and Looking to 2020

I hope everyone is preparing for the Holiday season and looking forward to catching up with friends and family.  We at Anglers’s Alibi had another season filled with incredible fishing and memories – make sure to click below to read our 2019 season summary!  Also, Anglers Alibi is 92% booked for the 2020 Alaska fishing season and I want to make sure you, our fishing friends, know about the remaining options available before I start booking at the upcoming sporting event shows. – you’ll see we have some prime fishing spots still available below, so contact us to learn more.

Read the Full 2019 Season Review Here
and contact us with questions or to check availability
     
great pics of great Alaska fishing (see more pictures here)

2020 Dates That Are Still Available:
July 6 – 13, Week 2: 

Kings, sockeye, and start of the chum run (often the peak king week of the season) – 5 spots available

July 20 – 27, Week 4:
Just 2 Spots for Kings, sockeye, chum and pink salmon,

August 31 – September 7:
Silvers, pinks and chums, peak time for fishing for trophy trout, 6 spots left

In addition to these few spots, we have some spots for season 2 of the Nushagak River camp…with prime peak king fishing.  We have space from June 18 – July 4th if anyone is interested in 5 great days of fishing specifically for king salmon.  This river boasts the largest king run in the world and is something that should be on every bucket list for king salmon fishing.

2020 Booking Open:

FISH THE ‘NUSH FOR KINGS!
The Nushagak River offers access to early season King Salmon and the inaugural trip was solid in 2019 (read more here)
ASK ABOUT SAVING $200!
Contact Us Here to Learn More 

Full 2020 Fishing Calendar!
Get a Spot While You Can…
The camp is filling up quick for 2020, but contact us about any open spots this year or to plan for 2021
Contact Anglers Alibi
Read About Where You’ll Fish
Check our 2020 Season Calenda

Napier Outdoors’ Backroadz Camo Truck Tent Built For Outdoors Lovers

Napier’s Backroadz Camo Truck Tent.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – Niagara Falls, NY (2019) – Blend in, or stand out, with the all new Backroadz Camo Truck Tent from Napier Outdoors. Now available in the U.S., the Backroadz Camo Truck Tent includes all the same great features as the Backroadz Truck Tent 19 Series—fully built-in floor, storm flaps in the windows and doors, full rainfly and quick set-up—plus a great camouflage pattern! 

Perfect for hunting and fishing trips, overnight getaways and off-the-beaten-path finds, this Napier truck tent is available in four sizes to fit nearly every truck on the market, and meets all your adventure needs. Seamlessly install the tent within minutes in the back of your open-bed pickup to transform your truck into a comfortable and convenient home away from home, and discover the joy of vehicle camping. 

The Backroadz Camo Truck Tent makes camping trips a breeze with color-coded poles for set-up, and a lightweight carrying bag for storage. An internal gear loft and built-in lantern holder keeps you organized and ready to explore, while the entrance and two large windows offer optimal ventilation and breathtaking views. 

Equipped with a built-in floor, full rainfly, and storm flaps in the windows and door, the Backroadz Camo Truck Tent is designed to keep you high and dry through every camping adventure. Plus, it’s a do-good deed with every purchase. 

For every Backroadz Tent purchased, a tree is planted through Napier’s charitable partner, Trees for the Future. Trees for the Future helps communities around the world plant trees through seed distribution, agro-forestry training, and in-country technical assistance. S

leep easy in the bed of your pickup, and always be ready for the next adventure. – 

NAPIER OUTDOORS Napier is the world’s largest developer and distributor of Vehicle Camping Tents. Since 1990, Napier has been changing the way people view camping, by reshaping and merging the automotive and outdoor industries together. Napier was the first to revolutionize the camping industry with innovative and exciting Vehicle Camping Tents. 

Napier distributes Vehicle Camping Tents to automotive manufacturers and retailers across North America, Europe, and Australia. Napier Vehicle Tents are the number one selling Truck and SUV Tents in the World!

Wolverine On A Bender In Anchorage Area

Wolverines have always fascinated me – whether it’s the University of Michigan athletics teams – I’m not a big fan of them but they usually provide interesting storylines – or that awesome WOLVERINES!!!! chant in the movie Red Dawn.

 

The real-life wplverine seems like something of a mythical creature. Wolverines are known to be fierce predators but they aren’t easy to find in the wild. Check out how badass these critters can be when spotted doing their thing.

That brings us to some intriguing news out out of Anchorage. A wolverine appears to be running amok around the city.  Here’s the Anchorage Daily News with more: 

The Alaska Department of Fish and Game on Wednesday issued a first-ever wildlife advisory about not bear or moose but wolverine to people living in neighborhoods adjacent to Elmore Road, primarily from O’Malley to Dowling roads.

The wolverine has killed chickens and rabbits, according to a notice a state biologist posted Tuesday on the Nextdoor site, a private social network for residents of specific areas. The state recently began partnering with the network to issue wildlife alerts.

The animal was also caught attacking a big, long-haired black cat named Lenny around 2 a.m. Sunday. The cat survived without a scratch but was covered in leaves and slobber, his owner said.

Brown Bear Shot Dead After Breaking Into Eagle River Chicken Coop

Here’s a little more on the story, courtesy of KTUU:

“Most of our black bears go into their den in October, but we commonly have at least some brown bears out in November,” he said.

The bigger issue than a late winter, says Battle, is residents not securing livestock with proper gear. He said there’s an easy way to avoid attacks on livestock.

10 Percent Increase In Alaska’s 2019 Commercial Salmon Harvest

The following is courtesy of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game:

Juneau) — The Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G) has published preliminary harvest and value figures for the 2019 Alaska Commercial Salmon Fishery (PDF 131 kB).

The 2019 commercial salmon fishery all species harvest was approximately 206.9 million fish with an estimated preliminary ex-vessel value of approximately $657.6 million, a 10% increase from 2018’s value of $595.2 million.

Sockeye salmon accounted for approximately 64% of the total value at $421.1 million and 27% of the harvest at 55.2 million fish. Pink salmon were the second most valuable species representing 20% of the total ex-vessel value at $128.6 million, and 62% of the harvest at 129.1 million fish. Chum salmon accounted for 10% of the value at $63.8 million and 9% of the harvest at 18.5 million fish. Coho salmon contributed approximately 5% of the value at $29.6 million and 2% of the harvest at 3.8 million fish. Chinook salmon harvest was estimated to be just under 0.3 million fish with an estimated preliminary ex-vessel value of $14.4 million.

In terms of pounds of fish, the all species salmon harvest of 872.1 million pounds ranks 8th in the 1975-2018 time series, with chum salmon harvest ranking 16th, sockeye salmon harvest ranking 10th, pink salmon harvest ranking 9th, and coho salmon harvest ranking 33rd. The 2019 values for Chinook salmon were the third lowest on record since limited entry began in 1975.

These are preliminary harvest and value estimates which will change as fish tickets are processed and finalized. Dollar values provided by ADF&G are based on estimated ex-vessel prices and do not include post-season price adjustments. Final value of the 2019 salmon fishery will be determined in 2020 after seafood processors, buyers, and direct marketers report total value paid to fishermen in 2019.

Washington Post On Supreme Court-Winning Alaska Hunter

 

John Sturgeon, an Alaska hunter, made national news when he took his fight to use a hovercraft to hunt on public land. His case went all the way to the Supreme Court, a playing field that he won on. But as this week’s Washington Post lengthy profile explains, it was an expensive but satisfying victory that got a lot of attention and support for Sturgeon from some heavy hitters:

Why a warning? Because Sturgeon’s 12-year, only-in-Alaska battle to travel on a forbidden hovercraft through national parkland to his favorite hunting spot cost well north of $1.5 million.

“I had no idea how much it was going to cost, but you start down this slide and there’s no stopping it,” Sturgeon said. “Not many people could do what I did, because they don’t have the financial resources, which I don’t either. But I did have a cause that really ignited people.”… 

Among his donors: the Alaska Wildlife and Conservation Fund, the National Rifle Association, the Alaska Conservative Trust, national and international hunting groups, hundreds of ordinary Alaskans and one very wealthy one.

Edward Rasmuson read about Sturgeon’s case, called him up and found him sincere, and then offered to help pay the legal bill. “I maybe gave $250,000 to $300,000 to $400,000 – hell, I don’t know,” Rasmuson said in an interview. “But I’m fortunate. I’m wealthy, I can afford it.”

The story is a long one, but it’s definitely a fascinating read.

 

 

Report: ADFG Killed Fewer Anchorage-Area Bears In 2019

KTUU has some details on ADFG’s report about having to eliminate dangerous bears in urban settings:

According to new reports from Fish & Game, this past summer, only six bears had to be killed in Anchorage city limits. That’s a stark difference from 2018, when 42 had to be put down.

Cory Stantorf is the assistant area wildlife biologist for region 14-C for Fish & Game in Anchorage. He said he and other wildlife biologists do not have the perfect explanation for this change. However, he said they have a few ideas.

“It’s a combination of us having a good spring, so the green-up came early,” he said, “Over the last two years we’ve euthanized quite a few bears that have conflicted with humans so some of our conflict bears have been removed from the population.”

Hiker Reaches Help After Being Bitten By Bear

From the Anchorage Daily News:  A hiker made it to a cabin to report that a bear attacked and bit him on the Chilkoot Trail in Southeast Alaska. Here’s thd ADN with more information:  

Rescuers found the hiker at the Canyon City ranger cabin — nearly 8 miles from the start of the Chilkoot Trail in Dyea, outside Skagway — at around 9 a.m, the park service said. The hiker told rescue personnel they were bitten by a “brown bear” in the lower leg early Tuesday evening along the trail and were able to walk to a ranger cabin to call for help.

U.S. Forest Service Announces Tweaked POW Wolf Hunt Regulations

The following press release is courtesy of the U.S. Forest Service’s Tongass National Forest: 

CRAIG, Alaska – Biologists with the Alaska Department of Fish and Game (ADF&G), in cooperation with the U.S. Forest Service (USFS), announce that the state and federal hunting and trapping seasons for wolf in Game Management Unit (GMU) 2 will close at 11:59 pm on Jan. 15, 2020.

Management of wolf harvest on Prince of Wales and associated islands, collectively known as GMU 2, was based on a harvest quota and in-season harvest monitoring prior to 2019. When harvest approached the quota, ADF&G and the USFS would close the season by emergency order. This strategy resulted in unpredictable and often short trapping seasons. Trappers noted this strategy limited their flexibility to plan, and at times, has forced them to go out in unfavorable weather conditions to close their traplines in compliance with emergency orders.

ADF&G worked with the USFS, Fish and Game Advisory Committees, the Alaska Board of Game, the Federal Subsistence Regional Advisory Council, and trappers to develop a new strategy that would provide the flexibility and responsibility the trappers desired while sustainably managing harvest of this high-profile, wolf population.

The new strategy manages harvest of GMU 2 wolves by adjusting trapping season length based on ADF&G’s most recent wolf population estimate and its relation to the established population objective. At their January 2019 meeting in Petersburg, the Alaska Board of Game altered harvest regulations to implement this strategy by establishing a GMU 2 wolf population objective of 150-200 wolves, endorsing ADF&G’s harvest management plan, and aligning the opening dates for the state and federal trapping seasons (Nov. 15).

In August of this year, the Federal Subsistence Board (FSB) approved a temporary special action request by the Southeast Alaska Subsistence Regional Advisory Council to remove regulatory language referencing “a combined Federal-State harvest quota” for wolves in Unit 2 for the 2019-2020 regulatory year. The board also changed the wolf sealing period, the ADF&G monitoring process of placing a tag or seal on harvested animals, in Unit 2 to within 30 days of the end of the season. These FSB actions will promote coordinated management of wolves between ADF&G, and hunters and trappers using the new harvest strategy.

The new harvest management strategy is based on estimating the abundance of GMU 2 wolves. Because dense forest cover makes estimating wolf numbers from aerial surveys impractical, ADF&G, with support from the USFS, estimates wolf abundance in GMU 2 using a DNA-based mark-recapture technique. In fall 2018, ADF&G used the same large, northern and central Prince of Wales Island study area as in 2014-2017. ADF&G also collaborated with the Hydaburg Cooperative Association (HCA) and the Nature Conservancy (TNC) to establish an additional study area, monitored by HCA and TNC staff, adjacent to the southern and western boundary of the original study area. This collaboration expanded the study area to approximately 80% of Prince of Wales Island and over 60% of the land area of GMU 2.

Data collected from October through December 2018 resulted in a GMU 2-wide population estimate of 170 wolves, with high confidence that the actual number of wolves in GMU 2 prior to the autumn 2018 hunting and trapping seasons was within the range, 147 to 202 wolves. This is the most current population estimate. The autumn 2018 estimate was lower than estimates in fall 2016 (231 wolves) and fall 2017 (225 wolves), but well within the population objective range of 150-200 wolves established by the Board of Game. Under the new harvest management plan, when the most current population estimate (170) is within the objective range (150-200) the trapping season may be up to two months long.

The new wolf harvest strategy, built on the cooperative spirit among the ADF&G, the Federal Subsistence Board, and GMU 2 hunters and trappers, offers the full two months of wolf trapping opportunity allowed under the management plan for the 2019-2020 season. State and federal trapping seasons will both open on Nov. 15, 2019, and close on Jan. 15, 2020. The federal wolf hunting season in GMU 2 opened on Sept. 1, 2019, but the state wolf hunting season will not open until Dec. 1, 2019. State and federal GMU 2 wolf hunting seasons will also close on Jan. 15, 2020. Hunters and trappers are reminded that the goal of the new GMU 2 wolf harvest management strategy is to maintain the fall wolf population within the range of 150-200 wolves.

Please call the ADF&G Ketchikan area office at 907-225-2475 for more information. For more information from the U.S. Forest Service, please call District Ranger Scot Shuler at 907-826-1600. Maps of Federal lands within GMU 2 are available at Forest Service offices. Maps and additional information on the Federal Subsistence Management Program can be found on the web at http://www.doi.gov/subsistence/index.cfm.

Historically Low Amount Of Official Wolf Sightings At Denali NP

Alaska Public Media dropped an interesting piece recently about the lack of Denali National Park sightings of wolves, namely a record-low amount of animals spotted – one percent of agency wildlife surveys found wolves along the way.

Here’s more from writer Dan Bross:

Biologist and wildlife advocate Rick Steiner has been trying unsuccessfully for years to get the state to close wolf hunting and trapping on state lands along Denali’s northeastern boundary. Steiner points to the damaging impact loss of an alpha wolf can have on a pack, and makes an economic argument for why the state should care, correlating recent poor wolf viewing opportunity with dips in Denali visitor numbers and spending.  

“This is kind of the goose that laid the golden egg for Alaska — if we protect it and help restore it,” he said.